Following the arrest of a CNN crew on live television by police on Friday (US time), an apologetic Minnesota Governor Tim Walz promised that journalists would not be interfered with in reporting on violent protests after the death of George Floyd.

CNN correspondent Omar Jimenez and two colleagues were released within an hour after network chief executive Jeff Zucker called Walz to demand answers about why they were led away and held in a police van.

"We have got to ensure that there is a safe spot for journalism to tell this story," Walz said.

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Jimenez and colleagues Bill Kirkos and Leonel Mendez were doing a live shot for CNN's "New Day" shortly after 5am local time, describing a night of fire and anger in the wake of Floyd's death after a Minneapolis police office knelt on his neck.

'The original sin of this country still stains our nation today' - Joe Biden meets with the family of George Floyd and speaks out against systemic racism. Video / Joe Biden

Fired officer Derek Chauvin was later charged with murder in that case. .

When first approached by officers, Jimenez, who is black, told them: "Put us back where you want us. We are getting out of your way."

After being told he was being arrested and his hands were tied behind his back, Jimenez asked why he was being arrested. He did not get an answer.

The Minnesota State Patrol said on Twitter the journalists were among four people arrested as troopers were "clearing the streets and restoring order" after the protests. The patrol said the CNN journalists "were released once they were confirmed to be members of the media".

It's not clear why they were confused: Jimenez was holding what appeared to be a laminated ID card before his hands were secured, and his fellow crew members told police that they were from CNN and showing the scene live on the air.

"I've never seen anything like this," CNN "New Day" co-anchor John Berman said.

After being released, Jimenez said he was glad that his arrest was shown on the air.

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"You don't have to doubt my story," he said. "It's not filtered in any way. You saw it for your own eyes. That gave me a little bit of comfort. But it was definitely nerve-wracking."

At a later news conference, Walz said that "I take full responsibility. There is absolutely no reason something like that should happen ... This is a very public apology to that team."

The arrest drew widespread condemnation across the news industry. CNN competitors MSNBC, CBS News and Fox News all issued statements in support of Jimenez, along with the Society of Professional Journalists and the National Association of Black Journalists.

CNN accepted Walz's apology, saying the network appreciated the sincerity of his words.

Walz's words in support of journalists had impact at a time when the news media was often under attack, said Jane E Kirtley, Silha Professor of Media Ethics and Law and director of the Silha Centre at the University of Minnesota.

"It's really important for the governor to make that kind of statement to emphasise to everyone, especially law enforcement, that the press has an important job to do ... and they need to be respected," said Kirtley, who lives blocks away from the protests and could still smell smoke from the fires on Friday.

Meanwhile, there were signs on Friday that cable news networks, who were spending much of their time covering the story, have become sensitive to the impact of showing witness video of Floyd's treatment by police.

News anchors on all three networks usually warned viewers of its graphic nature before showing the video.

"I must warn you that this is difficult to watch," said CNN's Brianna Keilar, "but it is important to remember."