Apple has officially confirmed its plans to phase out iTunes.

Following months of rumours, the firm revealed it will be killing off the 18-year-old music library in favor of its three newer entertainment apps: Apple Music, Apple Podcast, and Apple TV.

Apple says you'll still have access to all of your existing music, whether you "downloaded the songs, purchased them or ripped them from a CD.'

The firm also promised the new system will include 'all the features you'd expect from iTunes, all while being blazingly fast".

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In addition to the death of iTunes, Apple also confirmed another long-running rumour: the launch of 'dark mode' for iPhone.

The firm unveiled the sleek new design option alongside iOS 13, which will come with faster download speeds, smarter task reminders, a new keyboard to allow for ultra-fast swipe-typing, and updates for Mail, Notes, and Safari.

Apple kicked off the Worldwide Developers Conference 2019 today with a more detailed look at its new streaming services and the latest operating systems for its family of devices. It also unveiled its first new Mac Pro in years, boasting a cheese grater-style tower, and the new macOS (operating software): Catalina.

Among the most notable announcements are new security features similar to those already seen in Google and Facebook, including a 'Sign in with Apple' tool designed to authenticate your identity using FaceID "without revealing any personal information".

Apple also revealed the App Store is finally coming to Apple Watch, allowing users to download apps directly to the wearable for the first time, and unveiled the new period-tracking app, Cycle Tracker.

Sign in with Apple explained

Apple has introduced a new secure login system similar to those already in use by Google and Facebook.

Apple Login will let users log into accounts using their Apple ID, without sharing personal information.

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This will also include FaceID or Touch ID, with two-factor authentication built in.

You'll also be given the option to decide what information is shared with developers.

This means you'll be able to hide your name and email address.

If this is the case, Apple will generate a unique address for you.

"We'll create a unique random address that forwards to your real address," Apple's Meg Frost said.

"Each app gets a unique random address, and you can disable them anytime when you're tired of hearing from a specific app."

Apple's plan to rejuvenate sales in face of iPhone slump

Earlier, Apple chief executive Tim Cook had previewed upcoming changes to the company's phone and computer software, with some intended to help it diversify to offset eroding sales of its bedrock product, the iPhone.

Many of the software updates are expected to be tailored for digital services such as video streaming that Apple is rolling out to lessen its iPhone dependence.

Cook began his keynote by recapping services Apple announced earlier this spring, including a news reading service and an arcade service for mobile games. He also previewed one of the original shows Apple is producing for its new videostreaming service, "For All Mankind," set in an alternate history where the Soviets were first to land a man on the moon.

Apple CEO Tim Cook, left, and chief design officer Jonathan Ive look at a Mac Pro in the display room at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference. Photo / AP
Apple CEO Tim Cook, left, and chief design officer Jonathan Ive look at a Mac Pro in the display room at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference. Photo / AP

The software showcase is an annual rite. This year, however, Apple is grappling with its biggest challenge since its visionary co-founder, Steve Jobs, died nearly eight years ago.

Although still popular, the iPhone is no longer reliably driving Apple's profits the way it has for the past decade. Sales have fallen sharply for the past two quarters, and could suffer another blow if China's government targets the iPhone in retaliation for the trade war being waged by US President Donald Trump.

Apple emphasised its privacy protections during the keynote — following along with Facebook, Google and other major tech companies' scripts this year. In its new operating system iOS13, the company is introducing "Sign in with Apple" to let users sign into apps without using similar sign-in services from Facebook and Google. The sign in will let you hide your actual email address if you choose. It is also making it easier to only show your location to apps once and not continually.

Apple's senior vice president of Software Engineering Craig Federighi speaks during the 2019 Apple Worldwide Developer Conference. Photo/Getty Images
Apple's senior vice president of Software Engineering Craig Federighi speaks during the 2019 Apple Worldwide Developer Conference. Photo/Getty Images

Another potential problem looms for Apple. Regulatory complaints and a consumer lawsuit both question whether Apple has been abusing the power of its iPhone app store to thwart competition and gouge smaller technology companies that rely on it to attract users and sell their services.

Apple is trying to adapt by squeezing money from digital services tailored for the more than 900 million iPhones currently in use.

Of course, the company hasn't totally abandoned the iPhone. The newest version of Apple's iPhone operating system, iOS 13, will feature a dark mode and faster tools, including a facial unlock that Apple says will open your phone 30 per cent faster.

Apple fans have long waited for the company to launch dark mode. Photo/Getty Images
Apple fans have long waited for the company to launch dark mode. Photo/Getty Images

The biggest remake of a single app is a makeover of Apple Maps, which will debut later this year. It includes more granular street and place data that Apple says it collected with street and aerial footage — tactics its largest mobile app rival Google has been using for years.

Apple also unveiled several new apps for its smartwatch, including independent apps that don't rely on the iPhone. The App Store will be available on the watch, making it possible for people to find and download apps right on their watch — expanding the availability of purchases that generate commissions for Apple.

Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the new Mac Pro. Photo/Getty Images
Apple CEO Tim Cook announces the new Mac Pro. Photo/Getty Images

The event is expected to usher out the iTunes software that Apple rolled out 16 years ago to sell and manage digital music for the iPod, which paved the way for the iPhone.

Apple has already phased out the iTunes from the iPhone and iPad, but now it's expected to do the same on the Mac and other personal computers. Instead of iTunes, separate apps for music, video and podcasts are expected to be offered for computers, mirroring how Apple already handles those services on mobile devices.

Reporting: Daily Mail, News.com.au