Nearly two months on from that fateful game - the Black Caps were involved in yet another bizarre finish to a cricket match.

The umpires from that heartbreaking World Cup loss admitted they got it wrong when it came to the Ben Stokes fiasco.

This time, the Black Caps were on the right side of history when the Sri Lankan fielder Shehan Jayasuriya took a catch on the boundary, only to collide with a fellow teammate Kusal Mendis and go tumbling over the rope.

But questions have been raised as to whether the six signalled by the umpire should have been replaced with a wicket.

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Fans from around the world claimed Jayasuriya successfully had control of the catch before the unfortunate incident that took him over the rope.

Some claim the ball was firmly grasped in the hand while Jayasuriya's body touched the ground in the field of play.

Frame 1: Jayasuriya (left) takes the catch. Photo / Sky Sport
Frame 1: Jayasuriya (left) takes the catch. Photo / Sky Sport
Frame 2: Jayasuriya collides with Kusal Mendis. Photo / Sky Sport
Frame 2: Jayasuriya collides with Kusal Mendis. Photo / Sky Sport

However, unfortunately for Sri Lankan cricket fans, the umpires got the decision spot on, debunking any theory the home side were robbed.

Law 32 of cricket states "The act of making the catch shall start from the time when a fielder first handles the ball and shall end when a fielder obtains complete control both over the ball and over his own movement."

Frame 3: Shehan Jayasuriya goes crashing to the floor after colliding with his teammate. Photo / Sky Sport
Frame 3: Shehan Jayasuriya goes crashing to the floor after colliding with his teammate. Photo / Sky Sport
Frame 4: While the ball is in control, the fielder's body uncontrollably hits the ground, coming inches to the boundary rope. Photo / Sky Sport
Frame 4: While the ball is in control, the fielder's body uncontrollably hits the ground, coming inches to the boundary rope. Photo / Sky Sport

In the case of Jayasuriya, the collision meant he never had "complete control" over "his own movement" which eventually saw him hit the rope.

Frame 5: Still not in control of his body, Jayasuriya moves even closer to the rope. Photo / Sky Sport
Frame 5: Still not in control of his body, Jayasuriya moves even closer to the rope. Photo / Sky Sport
Frame 6: Despite maintaining control of the ball in the hand, the Sri Lankan fielder has lost control of his body and fallen over the boundary, meaning the ball has gone for 6 runs. Photo / Sky Sport
Frame 6: Despite maintaining control of the ball in the hand, the Sri Lankan fielder has lost control of his body and fallen over the boundary, meaning the ball has gone for 6 runs. Photo / Sky Sport

Nevertheless, Black Caps fans may take this one as a sip of revenge for the World Cup heartache.

It was a freakish finish to a freakishly familiar match, but one that probably won't go down as a trivia quiz question any time soon.