Any road death or injury is unacceptable, says Auckland Transport, as it releases sobering data for 2019.

New research shows that 40 people died and an additional 567 were seriously injured on Tāmaki Makaurau roads last year.

There was also a 30 per cent increase in road deaths or serious injuries where those involved tested positive for alcohol or drug consumption, or refused to take the test.

Subscribe to Premium

AT's executive general manager of safety, Bryan Sherritt, says that no one should be killed or seriously injured for simply moving around the city.

Advertisement

"Although 14 lives were saved, and 42 serious injuries prevented in 2019 on Tāmaki Makaurau roads compared to 2018, 40 people tragically lost their lives and 567 people were seriously injured.

"The lives of the loved ones of these 40 people will never be the same again. This is simply unacceptable."

It comes as new speed limits on Auckland roads come into force as part of AT's Safe Speeds programme.

Speed limits will lower on around 600 roads in Auckland's city centre and on some roads in the Rodney local board area and in the Franklin local board area from June 30.

Most of the speed changes were in the Waitematā, Rodney and Franklin Local Board areas, along with changes to approximately 100 other roads in Auckland, Sherritt said.

Research shows that 40 people died and an additional 567 were seriously injured on Tāmaki Makaurau roads last year. Photo / Auckland Transport
Research shows that 40 people died and an additional 567 were seriously injured on Tāmaki Makaurau roads last year. Photo / Auckland Transport

The Herald last year revealed that the NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) estimated about 87 per cent of speed limits were too high for the conditions.

In October 2019 AT announced it would lower speed limits on scores of Auckland CBD roads, sparking criticism from the Automobile Association for failing to listen to public concerns over "large-scale" speed limits cuts, which could lead to poor compliance.

"AA Members and all Aucklanders support the idea of reduced speeds on high-risk roads, but the big-bang, blanket reductions that AT is proposing are too much, too fast," AA spokesman Barney Irvine said at the time.

Advertisement

To keep road users and residents safe, and to make speeds survivable in case of a crash, most speed limits will go down from 50km/h to 30km/h.

However, Nelson, Hobson and Fanshawe streets will each have a new speed limit of 40km/h, down from 50km/h.

Some shared streets like Federal St will continue to have a 10km/h speed limit.

AT said the reduced speed limits were just one of a raft of measures the council-controlled organisation was taking to make road safer for all users. Photo / Auckland Transport
AT said the reduced speed limits were just one of a raft of measures the council-controlled organisation was taking to make road safer for all users. Photo / Auckland Transport

The new data underscored the need for these speed reductions as part of the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019, Sherritt said.

"We must all work together in our commitment towards making our roads safer.

"When you see the new speed limit signs around Auckland from Tuesday, take care and follow these safer speed limits.

"If we work together, we can make sure that our loved ones come home to us each night."

Information on where the speeds are changing come Tuesday is available on AT's website, as is more detail on the upcoming changes.

READ MORE:
'Lower speed limits will weaken the economy': Criticism of Government's road safety plan
Government to bring in speed limit cuts around every school in NZ
Speed limits begin to come down
New reduced speed limits around Paengaroa and Ōkere Falls