All Black Jack Goodhue's mullet is pinker and curlier than usual but it's still business in the front and party in the back after the public voted to save his famous hair-do.

Hundreds of people attended Mullet in the Park at the Kerikeri Sports Complex yesterday to celebrate mullets and find out the fate of what is arguably New Zealand's best-known mullet.

The event was the culmination of the Summer of the Mullet campaign which encouraged residents to grow a mullet to raise $100,000 for the Bald Angels Charitable Trust which supports at-risk youth and needy families via its various networks and programmes.

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The public had until February to have their say on whether Goodhue's famous locks should stay or be shaved off but on the day the "stay" vote won and the Kawakawa All Black's mullet was permed and dyed pink.

The start of All Black Jack Goodhue's mullet transformation. Photo / John Stone
The start of All Black Jack Goodhue's mullet transformation. Photo / John Stone

Goodhue said the day wasn't just about celebrating mullets.

"It's to celebrate Northland and raise money to try to bring the youth up and give the opportunities to those that need them the most. The money that's raised today is going to go towards youth that need mentors," he said.

Bald Angels founder Therese Wickbom said the day was "amazing".

"It's exceptional, it really is - and he is such an exceptional human being," she said.

"I heard he was a good guy but I couldn't praise him high enough, he's just been absolutely amazing. And to get a perm and dye his hair pink, I don't think there's too many All Blacks that have done that."

Mellany Tauroa with 3-year-old son Kauri. Photo / John Stone
Mellany Tauroa with 3-year-old son Kauri. Photo / John Stone

Goodhue's mullet of course was not the only one on show yesterday. Wickbom said there were about 50 mullets at the event and a competition which included categories like prettiest mullet, whānau, vintage and ugliest mullet.

Eight-year-old Stirling was crowned the Mullet King on the day.

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"He hasn't cut his hair ever," Wickbom said.

Kerkeri local Grayson Black's hairdo definitely says business in the front and party in the back. Photo / John Stone
Kerkeri local Grayson Black's hairdo definitely says business in the front and party in the back. Photo / John Stone

She said that on Saturday the total funds raised were about $25,000. There was more raised at the event yesterday including an auction where an All Black World Cup jersey sold for $1700.

"It's nowhere near what we aimed for but we're hoping people will feel more inclined and they now know the kaupapa. They understand that all our children deserve to thrive and some kids just don't have the opportunity. We have renamed the mullet 'business at the front, party at the back and hope in the middle'," she said.

People can still donate via the Givealittle.

Marc Black tries out the photo board. Photo / John Stone
Marc Black tries out the photo board. Photo / John Stone