The Kiwi double-double – and two victory hakas - stole the show at the Sevens World Cup.

Less than a day after their female counterparts defended their crown, the New Zealand men have also won in dominant fashion – outclassing England 33-12 in Monday's [NZT] final in San Francisco.

It's been the first time in each competition a team has successfully backed up a World Cup title.

Sione Molia scored two of New Zealand's five tries in the men's final, while Joe Ravouvou also scored one to solidify his spot as the tournament's joint leading tryscorer, before being named tournament MVP.

Advertisement

It followed a gutsy semi-final win where New Zealand were too strong for Olympic champions and arch-rivals Fiji, in a physical playoff.

New Zealand co-captain Scott Curry said the final day of the three-day knockout tournament was challenging.

"It was a tough day," said Curry.

"Fiji, that game went down to the wire and to back it up with a good performance against England who came back at us in the second half but to stick it out is something we are really proud of"

New Zealand players perform a Haka after beating England in the Rugby Sevens World Cup championship final in San Francisco, Sunday, July 22, 2018. Photo / AP
New Zealand players perform a Haka after beating England in the Rugby Sevens World Cup championship final in San Francisco, Sunday, July 22, 2018. Photo / AP

New Zealand was able to close down attacking threats from both opponents on an influential day, forced into making 18 tackles during the semi-final.

"We always say that defence is going to be the real reflection of our culture because it's where you're going to have to bust your arse I guess, for lack of a better term, for each other. So we really look at that when reviewing our games" Curry said.

It's an extra-special win for Curry who missed out on the victorious 2013 campaign at last minute due to injury.

"It was really disappointing for me back in 2013, so to come here to San Francisco, who've put on an awesome tournament, makes me proud of how we've played as a team and especially the many players who have stepped up individually"

Kurt Baker and Curry's fellow co-captain Tim Mikkelson were the only two who returned to the tournament from the 2013 success.

New Zealand players celebrate after beating England in the Rugby Sevens World Cup championship final in San Francisco, Sunday, July 22, 2018. Photo / AP
New Zealand players celebrate after beating England in the Rugby Sevens World Cup championship final in San Francisco, Sunday, July 22, 2018. Photo / AP

Baker said it's hard to compare wins, but said as smaller nations continue to evolve their sevens programmes, things are always getting tougher.

"It's a really tough competition now, and to come away with a world cup in 2018 is not easy.

"Any time you win in a black jersey is pretty special, and I suppose we have an expectation to win, and it comes with this jersey, so we've done the job and we can now look forward to it and enjoy their next challenge.

Baker posted a cheeky photo of the team celebrating on Instagram.

Curry said following up the success of the Black Ferns sevens the day prior was motivating.

"It's awesome to be able to emulate what they did a day earlier and go back to back for the first time ever, and it'll be good to go home with two back to back world cups that's for sure.

The World Cup victory caps off an encouraging opening year in charge for head coach Clark Laidlaw, who was named coach of the tournament.

Curry was quick to credit Laidlaw for what he and assistant Junior Tomasi Cama have built through the year.

"[They have] built a culture in our team from the ground up basically, and the tactical work that they do which we go out and execute works really well.

"A lot of how we played today was tactically executed by them, which worked really well.
Baker joked that Laidlaw will be the first to start celebrating.

"I'm surprised he's not at the bar actually – he's Scottish so I'm sure we'll see him at the bar later"

After a lengthy season with a full world series, a Commonwealth Games and a world cup, Curry said a six-week break for the team is important.

"Just to get away from rugby and really relax and come back refreshed and ready to go for the next couple of years."

World Rugby will have smiles on their faces as they jet out of San Francisco and the United States' first Rugby World Cup event.

More than 100-thousand tickets were sold across the three-day event at the iconic AT&T Park baseball stadium - with World Rugby boss Brett Gosper subtly indicating a bid for a future 15-a-side Rugby World Cup event would be welcomed.