Key Points:

This little Toyota was spotted in a Paihia carpark. "I would love to see the Explore Hire person's face when this drove back into the car rental lot," writes Craig.

* * *

Allan McInnarney of Manly shares a story about a friend who received an infringement notice in the mail. "She discovered she was detected going 65km/h in a 50km/h speed limit on September 24, 2008. Normally this would be an open and shut case of 'done the crime - do the time'. But what is significant in my friend's case is she was being driven to the maternity hospital to have a baby by a very anxious father-to-be - and, you guessed it, little Hugo arrived safe and well on September 24, 2008. When she rang the traffic authority to explain her circumstances she was politely told she didn't warrant any special treatment and to just pay the fine or she would go to court. If this had been a traffic officer on patrol instead of that sterile thing mounted on a lamp post he would have said "follow me, guys", and escorted them to hospital with all sirens blazing. Come on, traffic department, waive that $80 fine."

* * *

Raymond A. Barrett of New Windsor doesn't buy Sir David Attenborough's rationale that it's hard to believe in God because there is death and suffering in the world. "May I point out that God created a perfect world with no death or suffering and then man stuffed up. If he wishes to believe the adult fairy tale that all the 'stuff' in space spun around faster and faster, compressed into a dot the size of a full stop which exploded into everything creating the planets, then over time (billions of years) the planets cooled and were rained on for millions of years, forming vast oceans and then one day, poof, the oceans came alive, found someone to marry, have kids and after millions of years became you and I. Therefore natural selection means to hell with moral issues, we are just blobs of goo passing through, waiting to be recycled."

* * *

Campbell Rountree explains the flag on top of Britomart. "It belongs to the building's primary tenant, Danish shipping company Maersk Line. In 1883 Peter Maersk Moller, one of Maersk's founders, grounded his ship on the coast of Scotland. Fearing for his life and worrying about his young family, he fervently prayed. A short while later he saw a large seven-pointed star in the night sky, which he saw as an affirmative answer."

* * *