Vote2020

The Green Party has taken a dig at its other governing parties which haven't released substantial policies by outlining its key battlefronts if returned to power.

It yesterday released a comprehensive 52-page document outlining the bedrock on which it will form its policies and hopes it will be the basis of negotiations to form part of the next Government.

The Greens also launched their campaign slogan and commercials which urge New Zealanders to "think ahead, act now" when they head into the voting booths on September 19.

READ MORE:
Election 2020: Greens launch campaign, urge Kiwis to 'think ahead, act now'
Paul Goldsmith admits to blunder in criticism of Green Party's pledge
Rachel Stewart on the Green Party and farmers
Chloe Swarbrick gets a major promotion in the Green Party

Advertisement

There are no new commitments in the party manifesto but condenses all its pledges into three key areas - healthy nature, fairer communities and a clean economy - and under each pillar are the Greens' various pledges.

Among them are the promises to ban greyhound racing and establish an Animal Welfare Minister, introduce a $325 per week Guaranteed Minimum Income for the out-of-work and bring forward the 100 per cent renewable electricity target by five years to 2025.

Co-leader James Shaw said the decisions the next Parliament makes would affect New Zealand for generations.

"We made a deliberate choice to fill the policy void at this election.

"The country is currently facing the single biggest economic crisis in many generations and we think this election should be about ideas and about our vision for our future."

Green co-leader James Shaw says their policy vision will be the bedrock for coalition negotiations if re-elected. Photo / Mark Mitchell
Green co-leader James Shaw says their policy vision will be the bedrock for coalition negotiations if re-elected. Photo / Mark Mitchell

At the launch of the manifesto yesterday, Shaw said the policy platform would "serve as a basis for negotiations as we seek to form a new Government after the election with the Labour Party" - specifically leaving out NZ First.

He said ideally the Greens would get back into Government "unencumbered".

This week NZ First leader Winston Peters said the Greens were "away with the fairies", with Shaw hitting back calling NZ First "an agent of chaos".

Advertisement

Yesterday Shaw said NZ First had been "more of a millstone than a handbrake".

Co-leader Marama Davidson said releasing the manifesto wasn't a direct shot at the Labour Party, which has signalled it won't release any policy statements until the final weeks of the campaign.

"It's what we stand for, it's what we have always stood for and it's what we will continue to fight for.

"We know that people want us to focus on the issues right now. We know that people want their politicians to be heads-down, doing the work and talking about how we are going to resolve some of the biggest issues that all of us are facing."

Green Party co-leader Marama Davidson says Covid-19 means Aotearoa could re-imagine itself. Photo / Dean Purcell
Green Party co-leader Marama Davidson says Covid-19 means Aotearoa could re-imagine itself. Photo / Dean Purcell

Davidson said Covid-19 meant Aotearoa had the chance to re-imagine itself in a way that didn't leave people behind.

"Future generations will judge us by the decisions we make today. I want my grandchildren to know that we made smart decisions with their wellbeing in mind."

Advertisement

The Greens have already unveiled two of "about six" fully-costed policies, including their Green Energy Plan which would immediately ban new industrial coal boilers, end coal use by 2030 and upgrade all state homes with solar panels.

Its other policy was its Poverty Action Plan which would see a $325 guaranteed minimum income for students and the unemployed, a Universal Child Benefit of $100 for each child under 3 years old which would be paid for by new wealth taxes.

Davidson said the Greens had learned from their first-ever term in Government they could work with other parties to achieve wins while "maintaining our differentiation".

And Shaw said they weren't taking anything for granted, given the polls. The latest 1News Colmar Brunton poll put the Greens at 6 per cent - just above the threshold to get back into Parliament.

"The situation is very fluid and we're not just going to sit back on our laurels and assume we're going to get back into Government."

The Greens' policy vision includes:

Advertisement

Healthy nature

• Ban or phase out activities like live animal exports, animal rodeos, greyhound racing, factory farming, farrowing crates and inhumane breeding of pets.

• Establish a Minister for Animals and a Parliamentary Commissioner for Animal Welfare.

• Create a fairer system for water allocation by introducing fees for commercial users like bottling plants. Iwi and hapū would be involved in designing the framework.

• Protect kauri from dieback.

• Ban set netting and phase out the most destructive forms of commercial fishing.

• Make kerbside recycling more consistent and phase out low-grade plastics.

Advertisement

Fairer communities

• Create a single "Family Support Credit" of $190 a week for the first child and $120 for each younger child.

• Entrench Māori seats in Parliament.

• Reform ACC into an Agency for Comprehensive Care bringing all health and disability support payments into a single system.

• Support drug reform in ways that reduce harm.

• Roll out Te Reo Māori as a core school subject through to Year 10.

• Recognise unpaid care and household labour by creating a Universal Child Benefit for children under 3.

Advertisement

• Close the gender pay gap.

• Oppose Aotearoa's participation in the Five Eyes spy network.

• Build more solar-powered and energy efficient state homes.

• Progressively increase the refugee quota to 5000.

• Expand free counselling to everyone under 25 and work towards extending that towards all adults.

• Ensure a $325-per-week Guaranteed Minimum Income for students and people out of work.

Advertisement

Clean economy

• Support regenerative agriculture.

• Bring forward the 100 per cent renewable electricity target by five years to 2025.

• Equip all suitable houses with solar panels.

• Ban new boilers.

• Establish a Public Interest Journalism Fund.

• Make electric cars more affordable and invest in better cycle lanes, buses and trains.

Advertisement

• Create thousands of jobs in green energy.

• Connect towns with fast, modern passenger rail.

• Make public transport more affordable.