All of those injured in the Whakaari/White Island tragedy have now been discharged from hospital, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says.

While the last patients being treated at National Burns Unit at Middlemore Hospital have been cleared to go home, they will receive treatment as needed.

Ardern made the announcement during a press conference in the Beehive in Wellington, as she updated the public on the latest decisions about the response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

She thanked the staff at Middlemore and other healthcare workers across New Zealand involved in the response to the eruption.

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"They do incredible work - very, very difficult work," she said.

Ardern visited Middlemore Hospital and spoke with staff and the families of the injured shortly before Christmas, she said.

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Twenty-one people were killed in the December 9 eruption. The bodies of two, tour guide Hayden Marshall-Inman and teenage Australian tourist Winona Langford, were lost at sea.

Time lapse of the White Island crater floor January 15th - 16th, 2020. Images / Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences

Jake Milbank, the teenager tour guide who suffered burns to 80 per cent of his body in the eruption, recently announced he had been discharged from hospital.

In an update to his Givealittle page, he shared that he was now in lockdown with the rest of the country in an effort to halt the spread of Covid-19.

Whakaari erupted beneath Milbank on his 19th birthday.

"One hundred and sixteen long days ago, my life, along with many others, was changed forever," he posted online on Friday.

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Tour guide Jake Milbank shared the reunion with his dog on social media. Photo / Supplied
Tour guide Jake Milbank shared the reunion with his dog on social media. Photo / Supplied

He's endured 25 trips to the operating room, but said he was fortunate to go the entire 116 days without "a single infection or setback".

"When I was first admitted to hospital my family were told that I could be in intensive care for at least three to four months, and that my stay in hospital could go on as long as six months or more."

Four months of operations, physiotherapy, and endless moisturisation later, he was finally discharged.

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116 long days ago, my life, along with many others was changed forever. During my time in hospital I managed to rack up a whopping 25 trips to the operating room, and I must say, my surgeons have done a remarkable job. I was told that when it came to possible infections, it wasn't a matter of if, but rather when. I was fortunate enough to go this entire time without a single infection or setback, which is absolutely amazing. When I was first admitted to hospital my family were told that I could be in intensive care for at least 3 to 4 months, and that my stay in hospital could go on as long as six months or more. After almost 4 months of operations, physiotherapy, and loads of moisturisation, I'm happy to say that today, my stay in hospital is finally coming to an end! To be able to walk out of hospital in less than four months after sustaining 80% burns is almost unheard of, and I owe it all to my amazing team of doctors, nurses, Physios and occupational therapists for getting me out in what must be almost record time. But most of all I owe it to my family, who have been with me every step of the way, assisting me with my cares and my every need. I also have to thank my friends, for always visiting me and keeping me sane during this long, hard time. To everyone In New Zealand and all around the world who have been showing me their ongoing love and support, I cannot thank you enough. You have all given me the strength and encouragement I needed, to keep working hard, and striving for the best possible outcome. I still have a very long road ahead in terms of my rehabilitation and recovery, but with the help of my family and friends as well as worldwide support I know I will get there one day. It is a shame to be going out of almost 4 months isolation, straight back in to isolation, but it is just good to be home.

A post shared by Jake Milbank (@jake_milbank) on

Milbank credited his "amazing team of doctors, nurses, physios and occupational therapists" for his miraculous recovery.

"But most of all I owe it to my family, who have been with me every step of the way, assisting me with my cares and my every need. I also have to thank my friends, for always visiting me and keeping me sane during this long, hard time."

He also had a message for his wider supporters.

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"To everyone in New Zealand and all around the world who have been showing me their ongoing love and support, I cannot thank you enough," Milbank wrote.

"You have all given me the strength and encouragement I needed, to keep working hard, and striving for the best possible outcome.

"I still have a very long road ahead in terms of my rehabilitation and recovery, but with the help of my family and friends as well as worldwide support I know I will get there one day.

"It is a shame to be going out of almost four months isolation, straight back into isolation, but it is just good to be home."

An aerial view of the island shortly after eruption. Photo / George Novak
An aerial view of the island shortly after eruption. Photo / George Novak

On March 11 Milbank revealed he was allowed day leave from hospital.

The first thing on his list was to visit his dog - who had been without him for 1.8 dog years.

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"Such an awesome feeling to be back out in the real world breathing in some fresh air," he wrote.

Fellow guide Kelsey Waghorn was discharged from Hospital in March.

In a post uploaded to the Givealittle page founded to support her and her family, Waghorn revealed she was cleared to return home.

Whakaari / White Island survivor Kelsey Waghorn was released from hospital in March. Photo / Supplied
Whakaari / White Island survivor Kelsey Waghorn was released from hospital in March. Photo / Supplied

"Words can't describe how good it is to be home - my own bed (that doesn't inflate and deflate randomly), the fresh air, the view from the lounge and, of course, our two dogs," she wrote.

"My days are still full of physio, hand therapy, OTs and district nurse visits, but I am home.

"Thank you once again for your continued support, love, advice and donations. They really mean the world to me."

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there’s no place like home 🥰

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Waghorn spent 49 days in Hutt Hospital, including 10 in its intensive care unit.

Given the severity of her injuries, for several days she had been placed in an induced coma.

"During those 10 days, no one could tell my family whether I was going to make it or not," Waghorn wrote.

"Thankfully, my little beaten-up vessel pulled through and I made it up to the burns/plastics ward, where I spent another 39 days."

She was later transferred to Waikato Hospital, where she remained as an inpatient for 16 days.