Auckland commuters face further disruptions on Tuesday, as the dispute between the union and NZ Bus continues with no compromise yet reached.

Around 70,000 commuters were affected by Monday's cancellations, and with no resolution reached at the most recent mediation, it will be a similar story tomorrow.

Jared Abbott from First Union said after a day of negotiations with NZ Bus, the problem was still not resolved.

"We put a proposal to the company that was within the budget, that would've seen the strikes ended tomorrow and put us on a pathway towards resolution, but they adjourned for the day."

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Abbott said the company arrived at today's mediation with their previous position and the bus service disruption will continue.

Many buses are likely to be off Auckland's roads in the upcoming days, possibly until Christmas.

Union members will meet on Tuesday to decide their next move, before meeting again with NZ Bus this week, Abbott said.

Today's mediation followed an unproductive last-ditch attempt to resolve the issue on Sunday evening.

NZ Bus CEO Barry Hinkley said today's discussions with the union were constructive and that new ideas presented were being considered.

"We look forward to further negotiations with the unions so that we can resolve this matter as swiftly as possible and get Aucklanders back on the buses and drivers back to work.

The drivers are pushing for better wages and conditions and have been holding pickets across the city over the weekend.

Drivers were suspended and thousands of bus trips in Auckland operated by NZ Bus were cancelled last week after drivers refused to collect fares.

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But Hinkley said there was no lock-out of drivers.

"The bus drivers can come back to work any time, they just need to collect fares so we can afford to run the services. Our contract with AT stipulates that we are responsible for collecting fares."

Abbott said the union members want to see urgent solution.

"For us the concern is that the longer they leave this position, the longer people become entrenched in this."