A pensioner housing group is working to improve its neighbour initiatives after an elderly tenant's body was found days after his death.

But Haumaru Housing - a partnership between the Auckland Council and The Selwyn Foundation - is steering away from commenting about the man's cause of death, despite a Coroner's report released to media this week saying he died of hypothermia.

The body of Bryan McGinty, 73, was found in his flat at Leabank Court, in Manurewa, on June 24. It is thought he lay dead in his bathroom for up to five days.

Haumaru Housing chief Gabby Clezy said it was working on improving services to help it better connect with its tenants.

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"We take our tenants' welfare very seriously and work to ensure that they are supported to live independently and to help them access any additional support they may need," she said.

"We aim to continue improving how we connect our tenants with the support services they require to live as they wish.

"These are people who are living independently and who have the right to choose what, if any, help they receive and from whom."

Clezy said the group was also working on strengthening a neighbours' initiative dubbed the Good Neighbour Programme, which promotes other tenants supporting their neighbours where possible.

Bryan McGinty, 73, whose body was found in his pensioner flat at Leabank Court, in Manurewa, on June 24, 2019. Photo / Supplied
Bryan McGinty, 73, whose body was found in his pensioner flat at Leabank Court, in Manurewa, on June 24, 2019. Photo / Supplied

A round-the-clock 0800 hotline was also consistently promoted, she said. It is the first point of call for tenants who have a concern or issue - including a neighbour's wellbeing.

Earlier this week, the Herald was given a coronial autopsy report that said the direct cause of McGinty's death was hypothermia.

According to that, the pensioner was found barricaded in his bathroom.

He had not been seen for several days and GPS data showed the last visit to Leabank Court was June 19 - although it is not clear whether that was to McGinty's home.

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Clezy said the group was not in a position to comment given the coronial report has not been officially published.

"Mr McGinty's home, however, was compliant with insulation regulations,'' she said.

The unit at the Haumaru Housing village, in Manurewa, where Bryan McGinty, 73, was found dead after not being seen for several days. Photo / Dean Purcell
The unit at the Haumaru Housing village, in Manurewa, where Bryan McGinty, 73, was found dead after not being seen for several days. Photo / Dean Purcell

DEATH 'UTTERLY PREVENTABLE' - COUNCILLOR

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Manurewa-Papakura ward councillor Daniel Newman has been a strong advocate for the pensioner's family and is demanding accountability from Haumaru Housing.

He told the Herald earlier he believed McGinty's death was "utterly preventable" if proper care had been administered in the first place.

"I do not believe hypothermia is an acceptable cause of death for Haumaru tenants living or dying in their units.

"These vulnerable people may die alone - but succumbing to cold exposure inside their units is not an acceptable way for these people to lose their life."

After McGinty's death, Haumaru Housing carried out an internal review and presented its findings and recommendations in a report to the Auckland Council in late July.

McGinty would not be the only pensioner found dead at a Haumaru Housing flat that week - with the body of Iain Holiday, 88, discovered in his unit, at Birkdale Court on the North Shore, two days later.

Clezy said it was important for people to note that the Haumaru Housing group was not a healthcare provider and relies on [general practitioners] and other services to provide healthcare to tenants.

- additional reporting: Newstalk ZB