The daughter of an elderly man who died "scared, cold and alone" says the organisation tasked with his care ignored repeated pleas about his failing health.

Bryan McGinty lay dead for up to five days in his Manurewa pensioner flat.

His only daughter was heartbroken and angry reading a just-released investigation report into the tragedy.

She believes the 73-year-old might not have died a terrifying, lonely death had those responsible for caring for her father done their jobs.

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"If they had acted properly Dad might still be here or he would have died in hospital with us holding his hands," said McGinty's daughter, who asked not to be named.

"Instead, he died terrified and alone."

McGinty was found dead on June 24 in his Leabank Court pensioner flat run by Haumaru Housing, a company owned 51 per cent by Selwyn Foundation — a charitable trust — and 49 per cent by Auckland Council.

The investigation showed neighbours had voiced serious concerns about his health for the five months leading up to his death.

READ MORE: 'Devoted' dad's lonely death in a council flat

A community manager from Haumaru Housing assigned to visit elderly tenants at the flats said she visited McGinty on Friday, June 21 and he "appeared well".

But GPS data analysed during the investigation into the months leading up to his death showed the last visit to Leabank Court was on June 19. It was unclear whether that was to McGinty's flat.

Bryan McGinty's unit at the Haumaru Housing run village in Manurewa. Photo / Dean Purcell
Bryan McGinty's unit at the Haumaru Housing run village in Manurewa. Photo / Dean Purcell

McGinty's South Island-based daughter said she would have been at her father's side "in a heartbeat" had she been aware how ill her father was.

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"I was fighting for him with every health agency from CADS [Community Alcohol and Drug Services] to Age Concern but still he died scared, cold and alone," she said.

"I identified his body and I know when he died he was absolutely terrified. I saw it in his [one remaining] eye."

The daughter said the community manager from Haumaru Housing was "dismissive" of her after her father died and "dismissive of repeated concerns from neighbours".

The report to Auckland Council about the months leading up to McGinty's death show a man displaying confusion, anger and struggling to walk.

It is a reflection of appalling neglect.

"I believe he was in severe Korsakoff's [an alcohol-related dementia]," the daughter said.

"I don't know how those symptoms were missed so monumentally.

The last visit to McGinty's unit was on June 18 after concerns about his health prompted Haumaru staff to get him to sign forms to allow them to speak to his GP about a needs assessment and to provide additional support.

On June 24 - the evening McGinty was found dead - a concerned neighbour, who hadn't seen McGinty for days, asked the community manager to check on him.

The community manager said she had visited McGinty the previous week and there was a care assessment in place. She did not go and check on him.

He was only discovered after the neighbour insisted on speaking to the Haumaru Housing CEO Gaby Clezy later that day. She called an ambulance to do a welfare check.

Manurewa councillors Daniel Newman and Angela Dalton want an immediate overhaul of Haumaru Housing and are calling for the resignation of Clezy after the findings. The report was prepared by Haumaru Housing for the council.

Manurewa Local Board chairwoman Angela Dalton and Manurewa-Papakura Ward Councillor Daniel Newman outside the Haumaru Housing village in Manurewa. Photo / Dean Purcell
Manurewa Local Board chairwoman Angela Dalton and Manurewa-Papakura Ward Councillor Daniel Newman outside the Haumaru Housing village in Manurewa. Photo / Dean Purcell

Haumaru Housing has managed the council's 62 pensioner villages since 2016.

Newman said if the community manager had visited McGinty on the Friday, as she said she did, she would have found him already dead or dying.

"He would not have "appeared well" as she claimed.

"He would not have spent the weekend alone in the flat."

Newman said Haumaru Housing had failed to provide appropriate care for a vulnerable tenant.

"This is not just about the days leading up to his death," Newman said.

"Neighbours had voiced serious concerns for Mr McGinty for months and Haumaru staff were well aware of this.

"He would not have been living there independently if he had been properly assessed. It is a reflection of appalling neglect."

The report to Auckland Council noted numerous failings in Haumaru's processes and promises to tighten those, within the bounds of its role as a social housing landlord.

The report found some inconsistent reporting by staff and some identified gaps in the management of some areas.

Haumaru Housing says it has investigated the community manager's conduct and imposed disciplinary sanction as a result.

The report said the staff member "should have checked on Mr McGinty earlier that day when alerted by another tenant".