Two brothers linked to the infamous "unruly" British family have admitted their roles in a roof-fixing scam and will be deported in the next 24 hours.

Johnny Quinn, 30, and Patrick Quinn, 27, who were charged with obtaining money by deception, appeared today in person at the Auckland District Court after appearing via video link from Whanganui Prison during their earlier court hearings.

Johnny Quinn then pleaded guilty to four fraud charges, while six charges were withdrawn by the police.

Patrick Quinn, meanwhile, pleaded guilty to five charges of obtaining by deception, with police also withdrawing five charges.

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The brothers, the court heard, came to New Zealand via Vancouver in late November "to work" but did not have the appropriate visas.

They would go on to defraud people across Auckland of $32,550 during a scheme which, the court heard, was instigated by another person who has since fled New Zealand.

One of the scams involved an associate of the Quinns conning a Remuera homeowner into believing their chimney needed urgent repairs, the court heard.

It cost the homeowner $18,000 in cash and a partially dismantled chimney.

Other frauds involved hoodwinking victims with fake invoices into paying thousands of dollars after convincing them they required roof repairs.

Patrick Quinn, pictured in the Whanganui District Court. Photo / Stuart Munro
Patrick Quinn, pictured in the Whanganui District Court. Photo / Stuart Munro

The brothers have, however, only paid a total of $15,000 in reparation after the sum was wired from an account in England, the court heard.

"It's not ideal that there are vulnerable victims out there not getting all their money back," Judge David Sharp said.

The judge called the scam an "opportunist fraud" and while it was not particular sophisticated it had involved a "very serious breach of trust for vulnerable people".

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The work the brothers did on some of the homes, Judge Sharp said, would have been of "little or no value".

"I have my doubts that anything useful could have been achieved."

The Quinns were nonetheless given credit for their guilty pleas, which Judge Sharp said was "saving the taxpayer the cost of prosecuting you".

Both brothers were sentenced to six months' imprisonment, but because they have been in custody since their arrests in February they will now be transferred to a detention centre before being deported in the next 24 hours.

Johnny Quinn will be deported when released from prison. Photo / Stuart Munro
Johnny Quinn will be deported when released from prison. Photo / Stuart Munro

The pair had also earlier argued - when attempting to keep name suppression - that they had been unfairly linked to the "unruly tourist" family, which caused havoc around the country during the summer.

However, others involved in the same roofing scam have been identified by police as being part of the travelling British family.

The Quinn brothers had first appeared in court in February on charges of obtaining $5000 and $18,800 by deception during December.

Patrick Quinn also faced an additional charge of obtaining $1000.

In April, more obtaining by deception charges were laid against Patrick Quinn for amounts of $600, $1900 and $3700, while charges were also laid against Johnny Quinn for obtaining $1900 and $3700 by deception.

Last week in the Christchurch District Court, a third Quinn, who was linked by police to the unruly tourists, pleaded guilty and was sentenced.

James Quinn, 58, admitted being part of the roofing scam and will also be deported after serving his short prison sentence.

The unruly tourists caused havoc during the Kiwi summer. Photo / NZ Herald
The unruly tourists caused havoc during the Kiwi summer. Photo / NZ Herald

The family of British tourists made headlines around the world after a video emerged of rubbish being strewn on a Takapuna beach reserve. There were also claims they had tried to rip off several restaurants and motels.

The first incident was filmed and showed confrontational behaviour at the Auckland beach, with a young boy threatening to "knock your brains out" when challenged by locals.

Facebook also banned New Zealand users from using the word "gypsy" on a social media page established to track the British tourists.

Meanwhile, two others linked to the tourists, Tommy Ward, 26, and William Donohue, 25, have both denied their alleged parts in the roofing fraud.

They were arrested in Lower Hutt before being charged with using a false document and are accused of producing a fake Roofcare business card and forged invoice.

Both men are due to appear in court again next month.

William Donohue (left) and Tommy Ward, pictured during an appearance via audio visual link in the Hutt Valley District Court. Photo / Melissa Nightingale
William Donohue (left) and Tommy Ward, pictured during an appearance via audio visual link in the Hutt Valley District Court. Photo / Melissa Nightingale

James Anthony Nolan, 26, was also charged over the roofing scam.

The assault and driving charges were the result of an incident on Auckland's Takapuna Beach in January.

Krista Curnow alleged a car veered towards her and the British driver tried to take her cellphone as she attempted to take a photo of the car's licence plate.

But Nolan fled the country after being bailed on fraud, assault with a weapon and reckless driving charges.

As a result of the runaway defendant, Minister of Customs Hon Kris Faafoi said Customs has changed its processes to now always conduct face-to-face checks when eGates reject a passenger.

Nolan was able to evade authorities by using an eGate and a passport which belonged to someone else, Faafoi said.

James Anthony Nolan fled the country after being bailed on assault and fraud charges. Photo / Sam Hurley
James Anthony Nolan fled the country after being bailed on assault and fraud charges. Photo / Sam Hurley

Another member of the group, Tina Maria Cash, admitted theft charges in February after stealing energy drinks, rope and sunglasses from an Auckland service station.

She was convicted and ordered to pay $55 in reparation.

At least five other members of the British group were also served deportation liability notices.