A New Zealand man who suffered a life-threatening brain aneurysm in Thailand is making positive progress and awaiting clearance for his next procedure.

Hamish Wickens, 45, suffered the brain aneurysm on his first night on holiday in Phuket.

He has since undergone a six-hour operation to clip the aneurysm, which was discovered to be incomplete, and was in the intensive care high dependency unit of a local hospital.

However, on Thursday evening, Wickens' sister Rachel Thorburn said a CT scan had shown positive progress, and Wickens had been moved to a general ward.

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He was now awaiting clearance to fly to Bangkok where he will undergo another procedure in Bangkok.

A Givealittle page created earlier in the week said Wickens had been suffering debilitating headaches due to vasospasm in his brain post op.

The vasospasm caused the blood vessels in his brain to shrivel, restricting blood flow.

Hamish Wickens has since undergone a six-hour operation to clip the aneurysm. Photo / Supplied
Hamish Wickens has since undergone a six-hour operation to clip the aneurysm. Photo / Supplied

He has been on medication to increase his blood pressure to increase the blood vessels to enable blood to run through them again.

"He is undergoing physio daily and is working hard towards his independence (which is unfortunately a while away). We do not know his long-term prognosis," the page read.

Thorburn said her brother was "an awesome man who is very loving and caring. He always tries to make you laugh and he is a neat brother, son, uncle and friend".

Wickens works in the mines in Australia and was just beginning his week's leave when he had his first ever seizure.

Thorburn said travel insurance would cover her brother's medical costs, but the family was raising money to cover loss of income and family expenses such as flights and accommodation.

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She said the family were also uncertain of whether Wickens would receive any support on his return to Australia, due to it being an international incident.

The Givealittle page has currently raised just under $5000.