One moment Sue Crang was enjoying a stroll with her husband on one of Auckland's most popular waterfront walkways, the next she was hurtling into the footpath, a searing pain in the back of her right leg.

Behind the 71-year-old, a boy of "under 14" was also sprawled on the ground.

Next to both, a Lime electric scooter lay on its side.

The St Heliers grandmother had just become the latest person to be hurt by the popular motorised transport alternative since hundreds were launched in Auckland and Christchurch as part of a three month trial three weeks ago — and she didn't even get to experience the joy of riding one.

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Sixty-nine e-scooter injury claims had been made to ACC between October 14 and 31 - two days before Crang was hurt.

The spate of injuries has sparked warnings from doctors, dentists and The Blind Foundation, and further complaints of near misses led to Auckland mayor Phil Goff asking for an urgent council report on safety issues with the e-scooters.

The Government is also looking at legislation for low-powered vehicles, such as e-scooters.

Dozens have been hurt since Lime e-scooters arrived in Auckland and Christchurch last month. File photo / Greg Bowker
Dozens have been hurt since Lime e-scooters arrived in Auckland and Christchurch last month. File photo / Greg Bowker

Crang and her husband, Tony, were walking arm in arm on the pedestrian side of Tāmaki Drive's shared foot/bike path, between Kohimarama and St Heliers, when she was struck from behind.

"It was like getting hit by a car. It was at speed and the next thing I was down on the footpath ... I was in so much pain — I thought I'd broken my leg."

An off-duty paramedic came to the aid of both Crang and the boy, and both later sought treatment at Eastmed Doctors following the 1.30pm incident. Crang's husband was uninjured.

X-rays and other checks showed Crang had escaped serious injury, but the pensioner still faces two or three weeks recovery from a sprained ankle and bruising to the back of her leg.

The incident had also knocked her confidence, an issue as she needed to stay active because of other health problems.

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"I'd be afraid to go down there [to the Tāmaki Dr path] again."

The boy who struck her, and his two friends — all of whom had "roared past in the other direction just before [the crash]" — were "very apologetic", Crang said.

"He was a very nice child ... but [the group] wouldn't have been older than 14. If this boy had been driving a car at that speed he would be prosecuted for that."

Sue Crang, 71, and her husband Anthony Crang, 71. The were walking on Tāmaki Drive's shared foot/bike path when Sue was struck by a boy on a Lime e-scooter. Photo / Michael Craig
Sue Crang, 71, and her husband Anthony Crang, 71. The were walking on Tāmaki Drive's shared foot/bike path when Sue was struck by a boy on a Lime e-scooter. Photo / Michael Craig

On Lime's app, users are told them must be 18 and have a valid driver's licence, but anyone with a credit or debit card can unlock one and under 18s had been spotted on the brightly-coloured machines.

Lime's Australia-based spokeswoman Kate Cullen said in a statement they were "sorry to hear of this incident".

"It is a timely reminder that Lime riders are required to 18 or older and must verify their age in the app and possess a valid drivers license. Users are expected to abide by all the same city and state laws they would if they were operating their own personal vehicle."

Safety was their number one priority, she said.

"Which is why we urge riders to practice safe riding not only for their own protection but for the safety of the larger community. It is up to the rider to deem what speed is reasonable based off of their surroundings."

Crang didn't know how fast the boy was travelling when he struck her, but he told her he lost control before the crash. She later saw him at Eastmed with his mother, but was unsure of his injuries.

The crash was an accident, but she was "really cross" e-scooters had been launched in New Zealand without being "properly managed".

The couple would write to Auckland mayor Phil Goff and the council's chief executive Stephen Town. They had already complained to Orākei Local Board member Colin Davis.

Crang said she wanted the speed of e-scooters limited from their existing maximum of 27km/h to 10-15km/h, and wanted them off footpaths and into bike lanes.

"I can see the joy of them for young people, but you can't have them going at speed on the waterfront here ... if a small child had been hit like I was it could have been far worse than I am."