Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has revealed her baby, Neve Te Aroha, will be raised to speak te reo Māori and English.

In an interview with Māori Television on Monday, Ardern said it was important to her and her partner Clarke Gayford that Neve has an understanding of Māori culture and believes speaking Te Reo is the first step.

Ardern told Native Affairs Neve won't be the only one learning te reo.

"I certainly want her to learn Māori. We haven't just made that decision but thought about how that will happen."

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"It's an official language. It builds our understanding of Māori culture as well. For me, language is what sits at the heart of that.

"I actually had ambitions of doing that [learning te reo] while I was on leave so, yeah, that's still a project for us."

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has revealed her baby, Neve Te Aroha, will be raised to speak both Te Reo Māori and English. Photo / Jason Oxenham
Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has revealed her baby, Neve Te Aroha, will be raised to speak both Te Reo Māori and English. Photo / Jason Oxenham

The Prime Minister revealed her ambition and wish for all children of New Zealand to be bilingual, believing it will greatly enhance their "education" and "cognitive development".

On Saturday Ardern arrived back in Wellington with baby Neve after six weeks on maternity leave.

She formally took back the reins as Prime Minister on Wednesday night and is now moving into Premier House in Wellington.

When asked whether Premier House had any work done on it to prepare it for Neve's arrival, Ardern said "not unless you count a second hand cot".

The birth of her daughter on June 21 made Ardern just the second elected world leader in recent history to give birth while holding office.

In interviews last week, Ardern said the experience of focusing on her daughter's basic needs helped her appreciate why people with young families may not find time for politics and that it's the Gvernment's responsibility to serve people, whether they are engaged politically or not.

She said that as she came to the end of her leave, she was anxious to demonstrate that she and Gayford, who will become Neve's primary caregiver, can create a routine that works.

"That I will come back and do the job that I promised to do."