A controversial Canadian speaker banned from the UK after distributing "racist material" is bound for New Zealand.

Lauren Southern, described as a "far-right political activist, internet personality, and journalist associated with the alt-right" is advertising shows in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide before jumping on a plane to New Zealand for one show in Auckland.

Southern, who was banned from entering the UK this year after distributing "racist material", will be touring in July with countryman Stefan Molyneux, a podcaster and YouTube personality and self-published author.

He is known for speaking about politics, race and anarcho-capitalism.

Southern was banned from entering the UK in March after antagonising Muslims by displaying flyers reading "Allah is a Gay God" and "Allah is trans". She claimed the stunt was part of a social experiment to prove Islam is a homophobic religion.

Molyneux also doesn't shy away from weighing in on controversial subjects. The self-published author has about 780,000 subscribers on his YouTube account where he publishes videos on subjects including Western civilisation, Islam, feminism and political correctness.

Titles of his videos include The Rise and Fall of Western Culture and The State of Masculinity.

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He has also uploaded feature-length videos voicing his opinions on the fall of the Roman Empire, immigration, Karl Marx and Bill Cosby.

Southern told Sky News on Monday night that she plans to "shock people" during her speaking tour.

The details for the Auckland talk are yet to be confirmed but in Australia, general admission tickets to the pair's talks, starting on July 20, cost AU$79 ($85) per person.

Those who want to get in early for "first choice of seats" can pay an extra $20.

A 30-minute meet-and-greet with the pair will cost $199.

If you want to spend 45 minutes and get signed merchandise, it's $499.

An "intimate dinner" with the pair will set you back $749.

In a video posted to YouTube promoting her visit, Southern said Australians are "at a crossroads".

"Do you want to retain your culture, do you want to retain your borders, family, identity?" she said.

"Or will the boats keep coming, will the no-go zones keep growing and will you become another victim of multiculturalism?"