Harry Willis had a steely look of determination as he successfully made it up Baldwin St -
the world's steepest street - on a pogo stick this morning to raise money for a cause close to his heart.

Through his efforts Harry, 11, raised more than $6700 for Ronald McDonald House, which provided his family with support and "a home away from home" when his sister Darcie was receiving cancer treatment last year.

Before he started this morning, he was worried he might not make it to the top because he had been doing flips on a trampoline a few days earlier and injured his back.

"I was worried this morning because my back was hurting.

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"I started getting tired about halfway through.

"Nearer the top, I didn't think I was going to make it. I thought I was going to trip."

But he made it nonetheless, all in one go, which surprised him.

"The crowd pushed me to go over my limits. They were great. I didn't expect there to be so many people here.''

He had a steely look of determination as he made his way up the street and was followed by his father and a group of about 50 children shouting "go Harry".

He was not puffed when he made it to the top, but was sweating heavily.

Ahead of today's effort Harry has been in training by bouncing on a pogo stick every spare moment he has.

Harry previously told the Otago Daily Times he chose the pogo stick as his means of transport after playing with his brother's one.

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A crowd of about 50 children followed him up the street, encouraging him. Photo / ODT
A crowd of about 50 children followed him up the street, encouraging him. Photo / ODT
Harry Willis, centre, said he started getting tired about halfway through but kept going. Photo / ODT
Harry Willis, centre, said he started getting tired about halfway through but kept going. Photo / ODT

"I started pogo-sticking a couple of years ago when my brother got one for Christmas.

"I had a go on it. I was like, 'I'm really good at this', so I just decided to do this."

Fortunately for his brother he got his own pogo stick.

"I've been doing training on my driveway at home and sometimes I come out here [Baldwin St] and do certain bits of the street — I do the steepest bit and then I do some of the lower bit."

His father, Stephen, said when Darcie was at her worst, she had tumours on her brain, both her ovaries, both kidneys, pancreas and in her bone marrow.

"She was pretty crook, so we didn't think we would be bringing her home when she went to Christchurch.

"So we're pretty lucky that she got through it."

Having the family stay together and visit Darcie in hospital regularly played a major part in her recovery.