A conversation between US President Donald Trump and the Queen at D-Day 75 commemoration event has been revealed.

According to the Daily Mail, As Trump posed with the Queen for one last photograph at the Portsmouth event, he told her: "It was a great honour to be with you."

Her Majesty replied: "I hope you come to this country again soon".

Queen Elizabeth II and President Donald Trump attend an event to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day in Portsmouth. Photo / AP
Queen Elizabeth II and President Donald Trump attend an event to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day in Portsmouth. Photo / AP

Trump and his wife, Melania, has left Britain at the end of his three-day state visit.

Advertisement

On the last day, Trump sat shoulder-to-shoulder with the Queen and other world leaders at "unprecedented commemorations" for the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion in Portsmouth.

The US leader and his wife sat in prime position for the event and even shared a giggle with her majesty during the solemn ceremony.

The military commemorations have added significance as it may be the last time for the Queen to attend such an event in her role as monarch.

Prince Charles sat next to her and has played a large role in the state visit, including hosting a private meeting with the President and First Lady.

Wearing a hot pink dress and hat, the Queen said "when I attended the commemoration of the 60th D-day landings, some thought it might be the last."

"I am delighted to be with you today. The heroism courage and sacrifice of those who lost their lives will never be forgotten."

Britain's Queen Elizabeth and U.S President Donald Trump look on during commemorations for the 75th Anniversary of the D-Day landings at Southsea Common, Portsmouth. Photo / AP
Britain's Queen Elizabeth and U.S President Donald Trump look on during commemorations for the 75th Anniversary of the D-Day landings at Southsea Common, Portsmouth. Photo / AP

The President and First Lady were also flanked by Prince Charles, UK Prime Minister Theresa May, French President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during the ceremony which included leaders from 13 allied nations, including Australia.

The leaders clapped as a guard of honour and the Royal Navy marched in, before taking the stage to speak one-by-one. The solemn moment capped off a three-day state visit to the UK that President Trump said has been a highlight of his life, having grown up watching his Scottish mother adore the Queen.

Advertisement

"She loved the Queen. And I always noticed, whenever anything was on about the Queen she would watch," the President told Piers Morgan in an interview aired ahead of the ceremony. "She was a big fan of this…I told her [The Queen] last night. She was very honoured. But my mother would always… she just had great respect. She understood. My mother understood people very well. She knew people. And she got it right from the beginning. The Queen is a great lady".

On stage, Trudeau paid tribute to his grandfather, James Sinclair, before describing the achievements of Charles Cecil Merritt, a Canadian to be awarded the Victoria Cross.

D-Day veteran John Jenkins stands onstage during an event to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day. Photo / AP
D-Day veteran John Jenkins stands onstage during an event to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day. Photo / AP

Australian Lieutenant Commander Scott Roberts, who serves in the Royal Australian Navy as senior warfare officer on the HMS Dragon, also addressed the crowd.

"We look with confidence to the day when all the people of the world may live free lives untouched by tyranny," he said. "We leave here friends, in fact, in spirit and in purpose."

Trump gave a religious reading, before a recording of an American's soldier's recollections and a swing dance was played.

The D-Day invasion helped liberate Europe from Nazi Germany. It was codenamed Operation Overlord and involved more than 150,000 allied troops landing on beaches in France, which was occupied by Germany at the time. It was a major turning point in the defeat of the Nazis, that finally occurred in May 1945.

U.S First Lady Melania Trump, U.S President Donald Trump, Britain's Queen Elizabeth and Prince Charles before meeting veterans during commemorations. Photo / AP
U.S First Lady Melania Trump, U.S President Donald Trump, Britain's Queen Elizabeth and Prince Charles before meeting veterans during commemorations. Photo / AP

A massive security presence surrounded the stage at Portsmouth's Southsea Common, with US agents wearing sunglasses lining the streets, huge steel barriers, police patrolling on horses and a drone ban enforced. Excited crowds sat outside while veterans and special guests passed through metal detectors to enter the secure area.

British veteran George James, who was 19 when he landed on D-Day with the infantry, said the day had been "brilliant but emotional, very emotional".

The 94-year-old was with a detachment of six men bringing reserve ammunition from the UK. "We got caught in a bombardment halfway up the beach, dived for cover under a truck that was bogged down, and when the stonking was over we were amazed and horrified to learn that the lorry I'd dived under was full of artillery shells. I was glad to get off that beach.

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, accompanied by The Prince of Wales, pose for a formal photograph with leaders of the other Allied Nations ahead of the National Commemorative Event. Photo / AP
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, accompanied by The Prince of Wales, pose for a formal photograph with leaders of the other Allied Nations ahead of the National Commemorative Event. Photo / AP

"We managed to find our unit that afternoon, they thought we were missing believed dead, and on the point of reporting us as such, but we turned up."

The group helped clear mines for five weeks before they disbanded and James joined another regiment on the front line. He has struggled to talk about his experiences in the past, his brain shutting down before he can recall what he saw on the beach. "I go into a trance," he said. "I just won't acknowledge it."

Asked what he thought of the world leaders attending, he said: "It's good of them to turn up".

Trump has moved on to Ireland this morning before going to France tomorrow.

- additional reporting NZ Herald