In case you missed it: This was one of the Herald's top stories on social media this week.

A number of patched Mongrel Mob members have turned away from violence in exchange for their own Heils Kitchen - a page dedicated to promoting healthy eating and improved lifestyles.

The page is run by Mongrel Mob members, describing themselves as the "mightiest cooking show in the nation".

The Mob leaders of Heils Kitchen claim they are dedicated to healthy eating and are encouraging people to ditch takeaways in exchange for smoothies and other healthier food items.

Advertisement

Members post recipes, videos and ideas on promoting "healthy kai and cooking in the household" while announcing their anti-methamphetamine stance.

The Mongrel Mob have created a page dedicated to promoting healthy eating and improved lifestyles. Photo / Facebook
The Mongrel Mob have created a page dedicated to promoting healthy eating and improved lifestyles. Photo / Facebook

The patched mobsters are asking members to "keep our whanau away from diabetes and obesity" by staying away from the takeaways and encouraging everyone to "cook fresh at home".

A large proportion of the posts showcase their latest meals, with fish-based recipes proving most popular.

Popular meals include prawn bagels, salmon wings, and the bizarre kiwifruit and cheese on toast, and chicken and tuna salads along with photos of fresh crayfish and other seafood.

The leaders of the group have also encouraged members to replace fried food and chips with salads to go with their fresh meat.

A number of posts have revealed healthy alternatives parents can cook that their children will like, including crispy coconut coated fried king prawns and dipping sauce as well as tasty meat treats served with healthier alternatives for chips.

This is just one of many healthy meals the Mongrel Mob are promoting in their lifestyle community group. Photo / Facebook
This is just one of many healthy meals the Mongrel Mob are promoting in their lifestyle community group. Photo / Facebook

The leaders of the group describe their lifestyle as "vicious and delicious" and remind members to "fry your food not yourself".

Members of the group have also showcased their Mongrel Mob-themed birthday cakes for their young children.

The Mongrel Mob make their own patch-themed cakes. Photo / Facebook
The Mongrel Mob make their own patch-themed cakes. Photo / Facebook

Despite the promotion of healthy-living and eating, the group was marred by allegations of lying and cheating during a noodle-eating competition between a Mongrel Mob member and a rival from another food Facebook group called Kai Now.

Footage of the contest shows two men sitting down in an attempt to be the first to eat 13 packets of instant noodles each.

Tensions grew as the Kai Now Facebook member asked the Mongrel Mob gangster if he was playing fair.

"I wanna see your bowl bro, that doesn't look like 13 packs in there," he said.

"I know those bowls too! Those are small bowls!"

A Mongrel Mob eating competition was been marred by allegations of lying and cheating. Photo / Facebook
A Mongrel Mob eating competition was been marred by allegations of lying and cheating. Photo / Facebook

The Mob's video kept cutting away from the contender and his bowl, leading to claims of cheating.

The Mongrel Mob claim they never cheated, explaining "the reception" was bad and "the phone fell over".

Each time the camera moved back, the level of noodles had significantly fallen - almost as if they had been tipped out.

"Oi! Your bowl looks lower. You cheated!" he exclaimed. "You dropped the camera three times G."

The noodle dispute has since been settled, with the two groups going at it in a pie eating competition on Wednesday night.

Kai Now group creator Robb Nai told the Herald he created the group as a way to bring the community together and help those in need or who may have low self-esteem as a way to promote healthy eating and engage with other members.

He explained Kai Now took on the noodle challenge as a way to promote the Mongrel Mob's healthy eating lifestyle group, saying it's great to see people wanting to make positive change within their communities.