You will often find Janice Lorraine in the heavy weights section of a gym.

But back in the late '90s, when the now 75-year-old took up bodybuilding, it was predominantly male dominated.

"The males treated me with slight regard and as somewhat of a nuisance. In fact they'd often stand over me," Ms Lorraine said.

"Thankfully an older male trainer (marginally younger than me) offered to train me."

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Janice in 2013, competing at one of her favourite competitions in Greece, aged 70. Photo / Supplied
Janice in 2013, competing at one of her favourite competitions in Greece, aged 70. Photo / Supplied

After about 15 months of intense training he told her of a bodybuilding organisation which didn't allow drug enhancement.

"I trained hard and went with him to compete in the International Natural Bodybuilding Association in Sydney and that's was how it all started," she told news.com.au.

She began doing aerobics, then weight resistant training in 1998, before taking up bodybuilding at age 55.

Ms Lorraine said that there was a woman slightly older than her who was a judge and who had competed but had given up bodybuilding in her early to mid-fifties.

"I've been the eldest ever since. It's now common to have over 50s and 60s category," Ms Lorraine said.

Janice competes in the 2004 Australian Championships, aged 62. Photo / Supplied
Janice competes in the 2004 Australian Championships, aged 62. Photo / Supplied

As far as she's aware she's the only one gracing the stage at 70 plus in natural, bodybuilding competitions — and better yet, she now trains herself.

Born and raised in Granville, Sydney, the grandmother of three has 23 titles to her name, with her most recent competition being the World Amateur Natural Titles in Phuket last year.

"I won my category. My aim is not to rival those younger than me. My aim is to show what's possible and to motivate and encourage women of any age, to live the life they want to live and not be bound by traditional stereotypes and roles and the expectations of others," Ms Lorraine said.

She is looking at competing at the end of 2019, just after she turns 77.

Janice was training twice a week when she first started at the gym, now she trains seven days a week, rotating weights sessions with cardio. Photo / Supplied
Janice was training twice a week when she first started at the gym, now she trains seven days a week, rotating weights sessions with cardio. Photo / Supplied
Janice (right) at the 2017 World Amateur Natural Titles in Phuket, Thailand. Her goal is to show what's possible and motivate and encourage women of any age. Photo / Supplied
Janice (right) at the 2017 World Amateur Natural Titles in Phuket, Thailand. Her goal is to show what's possible and motivate and encourage women of any age. Photo / Supplied

Q: What is your general diet? And does it change in the lead up to competitions?

A:

My diet is the same whether or not I'm in competition mode. I eat what I call natural nude food which means food without condiments or sauces. My diet is mainly unprocessed food, mainly salads and a small piece of microwaved sweet potato. The only meat I eat is grilled chicken, grilled fish and eye fillet steak. I allow myself one biscuit a day and one square of 90 per cent sugar free chocolate a day. I don't have any takeaway meals. I also enjoy a glass of wine with my evening meal.

Q: What does a typical training week look like for you?

A:

Monday, Wednesday, Fridays I am at the gym training my major muscle groups. On Tuesday, Thursday and Saturdays I do an 8km walk, x30 full push-ups, x30 tricep push-ups, x30 blackleg raises (x10 each leg and x10 together) and two minutes of ab work.

Janice wanted to share this picture to show there are ways to be strong that don't involve physical strength: She had a fear of snakes. Photo / Supplied
Janice wanted to share this picture to show there are ways to be strong that don't involve physical strength: She had a fear of snakes. Photo / Supplied

Q: Do the competitions you compete in have women your age?

A:

These days I'm always the eldest. Simply being in shape to compete makes me feel triumphant. Too many women feel it's all too late to do the things they'd like to do. This mainly results from pressure to conform to the accepted stereotype of an older woman. As a psychologist my aim is to motivate women of all ages to feel free to live the life they want to live and not let age and the expectations of others stop them.

Q: Any signs of slowing down?

A:

I'll always be training for as long as I live because I know what would happen to my body if I stopped. Many people even younger than me are getting around in walking frames and many lack both energy and strength and can no longer engage fully in life.

I'll keep up the WRT for as long as I'm able and I intend to compete in 2019. Beyond that I'll have to wait and see.

Janice is pictured in 2016, having fun with her partner of 27 years. He is 24 years younger than her. They met when he was 24 and she was 48 and 'it's been amazing!'. Photo / Supplied
Janice is pictured in 2016, having fun with her partner of 27 years. He is 24 years younger than her. They met when he was 24 and she was 48 and 'it's been amazing!'. Photo / Supplied

To learn more about Janice Lorraine visit her website.