Summer is the perfect time to play around with a pout that pops. The sun is out, it's party season and a bright, bold lippy boosts any outfit.

But having fun in the sun takes its toll on your mouth. Lip expert, and the brains behind cosmetics range, Lanolips, Kirsten Carriol, says sun, surf, sand and lipstick are all enemies.

"Your lips are really fragile, they're more fragile than your normal skin," she says.

"They don't have oil glands, they're essentially an extension of the skin inside your mouth and on the inside of your cheek."

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So you have to look after your lips. This means lathering them with sunscreen, trying not to lick them too much and drinking plenty of water.

"Lips are a really good litmus test for weather (whether) you've got enough water in your body or not," Carriol says.

"To not put sunscreen on them , but , put sunscreen all over your normal skin is a little bit silly."

Carriol's dad was a molecular scientist, leading her to investigate the benefits of lanolin - the yellow, waxy grease that comes out of wooly animals. She uses sheep lanolin her (in) her Lanolips range, making its way to New Zealand shelves next year. She says lanolin is the closest thing we've got to our own lip lipids.

"Lip products that coat the lips, that don't actually moisturise the lips, are the worst enemy. Number one is bees wax and number two is petroleum jelly. It's a perfectly good barrier, but it doesn't actually moisturise."

If you give your lips a bit of TLC in the evening, lathering up the lanolin and staying hydrated, then your lips will be more plump ; making them a perfect canvas for bright, on-trend lipsticks.

M.A.C make-up artist Amber D says a bright lip can take you from day to night - you've just got to mix up the rest of your ensemble.

"You can have a bright, poppy lip on and be wearing jeans and a singlet, it looks really cute and fresh, then if you take that out at night, pop on a little black dress and keep going," she says.

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The well-travelled beauty guru says orangey reds are proving popular in New Zealand, but scarlets, purples or a safer pastel pink are also hot.

The super thing about sporting a bold lip is the rest of the face can be kept low-maintenance. Keep it luminous and bare - a whisper of a creamy peach blush, groomed brows, a lashing of mascara and you're good to go, Amber D says.

"You're usually quite hot and you don't want to put on tonnes of make-up," she says.

"[Lipstick] makes it more dressy, without feeling like you're overdone."

Australian makeup master, Napoleon Perdis, is a devoted fan of a bold lip, but says this season, bright orange, coral, cherry red and fuchsia are his favourites.

"Think about the mood that you're trying to communicate, is it a classic red lip statement or something more punchy like coral or orange?" Perdis says.

While a glossy lip always looks pretty, a velvet matte finish is more on trend right now, he says.

"[But] not everyone feels comfortable in a bold, matte lip, [so] brightly coloured glosses
are an easy way to toe-dip into the bright-lip trend without fully taking the plunge.

"Another option is to create a stain by pressing colour with your fingers on to the lips and building the voltage in doses."

How to put your best lip forward:

1. Make sure your lips are well looked after. Exfoliate and keep them smooth with a lanolin based balm.

2. Chose a nude lip pencil, or a colour matching your shade of lipstick, then line and fill your lips.

3. Apply two coast of lipstick with a brush for precision then reline to seal in the colour.

4. If you're going to an event where you know you'll be eating and drinking maybe consider a more matte finish - it will be less maintenance.

5. If you're out and about make sure you keep your lippy on you for touch-ups throughout the day.

6. Perdis says: "Confidence wears a bright lip best."

M.A.C make-up artist Amber D will be joining us for a live chat on Thursday, December 22, from 11.30-12.30pm. Hop online, or get your summer beauty questions in early by sending us an email here.

- HERALD ONLINE