Auckland Council says Lime has finally provided the data it requested on Friday.

Read more: Guess who's greasing the wheels for Lime

The information will now be assessed - a process the council says will take at least 24 hours.

"Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have received information from Lime, and our teams are currently reviewing this, council COO Dean Kimpton says.

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"Lime's independent reviewer, Exponent, has indicated its review is continuing and that it will provide further information to that already delivered, by the end of the day on Wednesday. The licence suspension will continue until we have this information and have completed our review."

Meanwhile, Lime's situation has been complicated by a Washington Post report on similar braking issues and injuries in the US, plus references to earlier "break-apart' and battery fire scares.

Auckland and Dunedin councils ordered e-scooters off their streets on Friday after Lime supplied data about a wheel-locking malfunction that had lead to 155 incidents and 30 injuries.

Around 2000 e-scooters are now being stored in at Lime's Kingsland warehouse - 1000 allowed under its trial licence and another 1000 it was holding in reserve in case the scope of its trial was expanded before its expiry on March 31.

On Friday, Lime said it had pushed out a firmware upgrade that had addressed the wheel locking bug, and that there had since been no incidents. It also says the 155 incidents represent a tiny fraction of the 1.8 million Lime rides in NZ so far.

Mechanic Luis Prada at Lime's warehouse at New North Rd, Kingsland, where around 2000 Limes banished from Auckland streets are being stored. Photo / Jason Oxenham
Mechanic Luis Prada at Lime's warehouse at New North Rd, Kingsland, where around 2000 Limes banished from Auckland streets are being stored. Photo / Jason Oxenham

Lime confirmed it still had ex-Auckland Transport director and former Labour Party president on retainer. Williams has helped the Uber-backed startup broker meetings with key AT staff, plus Transport Minister Phil Twyford.

Academic Bryce Edwards said it was undemocratic for a power-player like Williams to open doors on behalf of clients, and noted that many countries require lobbying to be disclosed.

Read more: Lime riders in US being injured by 'sudden excessive braking'

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Twyford responded that anyone was welcome to make an appointment with him.

It's possible Auckland and Dunedin and other councils will ultimately give Lime a permanent license but with conditions. Those such as mandatory helmets or moving e-scooters to cycleways (where they are currently not allowed) would require a law change at the national level, initiated by the Transport Minister.

Mechanic Luis Prada at Lime's Kingsland warehouse. Photo / Jason Oxenham.
Mechanic Luis Prada at Lime's Kingsland warehouse. Photo / Jason Oxenham.

Twyford told the Herald, "There are some real benefits to e-scooters in that they offer a cheap, quick way to cover short distances and connect with public transport. We are always balancing the need for mobility with people's safety and scooters are not different."

Mechanic Vlatko Jovanovski at Lime's Kingsland warehouse. Photo / Jason Oxenham.
Mechanic Vlatko Jovanovski at Lime's Kingsland warehouse. Photo / Jason Oxenham.

Twyford continued, "Part of the solution will be creating more space in our street for people walking, cycling and using low-powered vehicles like e-scooters. The government is already planning to invest $390 million over the next three years with councils to expand footpaths, shared paths and cycleways.

"The government is also looking at whether we have the right level of regulation for low-powered vehicles. This include looking at potential speed limits and what vehicles should be allowed on the footpath."