One of the Australian tourists critically injured in the Whakaari/White Island tragedy has been able to tell her children that she loves them.

Sydney couple Nick and Marion London were both critically injured when the volcanic island off the Bay of Plenty coast erupted on December 9.

One of the survivors of the Whakaari/White Island tragedy has woken and told her children she loves them. Bay of Plenty Times photograph / George Novak
One of the survivors of the Whakaari/White Island tragedy has woken and told her children she loves them. Bay of Plenty Times photograph / George Novak

Both suffered burns to about 50 per cent of their bodies, as well as internal chemical burns after breathing in toxic gasses.

They were initially on life support and were among the badly injured Australians flown back to Australia last week for specialist care.

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The latest update on a GoFundMe page set up a family friend has revealed Marion has been able to talk to loved ones; including children Matt and Louise.

"We have good news about the recovery process for Nick and Marion London," a message on the page read.

Marion London has been able to tell her children she loves them. Photo / Supplied
Marion London has been able to tell her children she loves them. Photo / Supplied

"As of yesterday, Marion has been partially out of sedation for two days.

"Yesterday she was still very confused as to where she was or what was happening but could answer simple questions and was able to tell her children she loved them for the first time since the accident."

Her husband's progress has been slower, the page said.

"Nick has developed a fever but is on antibiotics for it and he is also slowly coming off sedation," the post revealed.

"He seems to be waking up much slower than Marion, but he was still able to open his eyes and raise his eyebrows in response to the things we were saying. Thank you for everyone for reaching out to us with support and prayers. It is still a very, very long road ahead of us, but with your support we are able to do our best in a bad situation."

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Nick London is slowing coming out of sedation in hospital in Australia. Photo / Supplied
Nick London is slowing coming out of sedation in hospital in Australia. Photo / Supplied

Earlier the page had stated both faced a "massive journey ahead".

"Doctors have said that they will be in hospital for weeks, if not months ..."

The page creator said the couple had been "very lucky to make it off the island with their lives".

They faced "many extensive surgeries", including some already carried out to remove damaged skin and graft some other areas.

Last weekend Matt London told the Sydney Morning Herald of the challenge his parents faced.

"The road ahead no doubt will be very difficult with many up and downs," he said. "Aside from a long line of surgery and recovery, all we know is that even if things go well, they'll be in hospital for weeks, if not months."

The couple's children had found it hard to reach their parents in the days after the eruption.

Initially, Matt's sister Louise was able to speak briefly to their father, who seemed in good spirits, when a nurse answered his phone and passed it on.

"To find out they were alive was of course a huge relief," Matt said. "We were so incredibly grateful to have our worst fears laid to rest."

New Zealand Defence Force staff during the body recovery mission on Whakaari/White Island earlier this month. Photo / New Zealand Police
New Zealand Defence Force staff during the body recovery mission on Whakaari/White Island earlier this month. Photo / New Zealand Police

He said he had increasingly come to appreciate how special his "gentle giant" dad and caring mum were.

"The older I get, the more I realise how absurdly lucky I am," he said.

"Talking to other people about their families and their relationships I can see that I have been blessed to have parents who have always supported us, always had our best interests at heart, and always accepted us for every part of who we are even when that hasn't always been easy."

Matt told the Sydney Morning Herald his dad was "very strong-willed, stubborn as a mule, but always a gentle giant and will forever be our mum's knight in shining armour".

"Our mum is the very definition of kindness and care. She is one of so very few people I have ever met that have such genuine love and kindness in their hearts."

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