Britain may be in lockdown but no one has told our wild animals. Many of them are venturing out because the world has suddenly grown more peaceful.

Across the UK, anecdotal reports suggest that nature is breaking cover, with more sightings of weasels, golden plover, oystercatchers and tawny owls.

Moles have been seen venturing above ground near normally well-trodden footpaths around the University of East Anglia in Norwich and in fields in Bristol.

Naturalists have suggested that the increase in sightings may partly be because people are paying more attention to wildlife on their daily exercise walks.

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In addition, the reduction in traffic and aircraft noise has allowed us to hear birdsong that is normally drowned out by the din.

As fewer walkers and dogs disturb wild areas, sightings of stoats, weasels and deer on once heavily walked tracks have increased, according to experts at Holkham National Nature Reserve in Norfolk. Larger numbers of sparrowhawks have also been seen.

A deer walks through an underpass in search for food in Nara, Japan. Photo / AP
A deer walks through an underpass in search for food in Nara, Japan. Photo / AP

Across the UK, oystercatchers, sandwich terns and ringed plovers have been spotted on undisturbed beaches and are expected to start nesting. Birdwatcher Duncan McCollin saw a pair of oystercatchers along with 20 golden plover at Northampton Washlands.

Ryan Brock, a PhD student in biology at the University of East Anglia, spotted a mole on campus above ground hunting for worms.

He tweeted: "Social distancing day three: Went birding around Uni of East Anglia campus and stumbled across this mole foraging! Very cool to witness."

Even with an absence of visitors, staff are still busy caring for the animals at Wellington Zoo during the Level 4 lockdown. Video / Supplied

Matthew Oates, an author and naturalist, said he heard a tawny owl recently and it prompted him to write a poem, which concluded: "I heard the owl's wings pass over, For the first time since childhood."

But experts fear the temporary reduction in human activity outdoors could lead to problems in the future.

Moles have been seen venturing above ground in fields in Bristol. Photo / Getty Images
Moles have been seen venturing above ground in fields in Bristol. Photo / Getty Images

Birds that lay eggs on the sand may think currently quiet beaches are safe nesting areas, but once the lockdown is over they could become busy again and put the nesting birds in peril.

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Elsewhere in the world, nature's comeback has been more dramatic, with wild animals exploring empty city streets.

Wild boar have descended from the hills around Barcelona. File photo / Getty Images
Wild boar have descended from the hills around Barcelona. File photo / Getty Images

Wild boar have descended from the hills around Barcelona, and wild turkeys have been seen strutting along the streets of Oakland in California.

A puma turned up in the centre of the Chilean capital Santiago, while in India social media has gone wild about footage of a stag scampering through the streets of the northern city of Dehradun.