When Joaquín Guzmán Loera, the Mexican drug lord known as El Chapo, walks into court this week and is sentenced, by law, to life in prison, it will likely close the book on a criminal career unparalleled in its scope and celebrity since Al Capone's.

But as with everything in the Guzmán case, getting to the end was not an easy matter. And an epilogue or two (or three or four) may still need to be written.

Guzmán, 62, was convicted this winter after a three-month trial in US District Court in Brooklyn that often veered, in head-snapping fashion, between

Advertisement
Advertisement