Scientific testing of the waters of Loch Ness by a Kiwi scientist hoping to uncover the truth behind the myth of the famous monster has made a "surprising" finding.

Experts took water samples to analyse environmental DNA, left behind by living creatures in the water as they shed skin, feathers, fur and poo.

Their aim was to get a snapshot of every living thing in Loch Ness in June 2018. This included delving into the theory that the Loch Ness Monster is a long-necked plesiosaur that survived the dinosaur extinction.

Other theories the samples are looking into is whether the monster is actually a giant catfish or a sturgeon (a species of fish belonging to the Ancipenseridae family).

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University of Otago professor Neil Gemmell told UK media that tests would go a long way to at least ruling out what the Loch Ness Monster isn't and says his findings were a "bit surprising".

"We've tested each of the main monster hypotheses. Three we can probably say aren't right. One might be," he explained.

The Loch Ness Monster, otherwise known as Nessie, is a creature said to inhabit Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. Photo / Getty
The Loch Ness Monster, otherwise known as Nessie, is a creature said to inhabit Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. Photo / Getty

"Is there anything deeply mysterious? Hmm. It depends what you believe. Is there anything startling? There are a few things that are a bit surprising."

Gemmell is hopeful of announcing the full findings in September, but wouldn't confirm which hypothesis he thinks is right.

"We're delighted with the amount of interest the project has generated in the science and, monster or not, we are going to understand Loch Ness, and the life in it, in a new way."