A victim of one of Australia's most notorious child sex offenders, Michael Guider, is leading a national movement to rescind his parole, warning the NSW government the convicted sex offender is dangerous and has concerns he "will kill again" if released.

Michael Anthony Guider, 69, is just weeks away from completing a 16-year prison sentence at Long Bay Correctional Centre, for 60 charges of child sexual abuse in the '80s and '90s.

He assaulted 11 children, aged between 2 and 16, mostly while working as a babysitter in their homes.

Buckling to mounting public pressure, the NSW government has applied for Guider to remain in jail for another 12 months.

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Michael Guider would drug and sexually assault children. Photo / Supplied
Michael Guider would drug and sexually assault children. Photo / Supplied

But Guider's victim, Chantelle Daly, isn't satisfied with 12 more months behind bars and is hosting a protest march down Adelaide's busiest street this Sunday to call for stronger action.

"Victims of child sexual assault shouldn't have to endure the stress and trauma of a pending release, the law needs to change," Ms Daly told news.com.au.

"We can never put our abuse behind us because we are terrified they will be released and do more harm to children."

She said it had become her personal mission to stop the release of Guider, as a survivor and a mother.

"As an adult, I'm not scared of my abuser, but the six-year-old girl inside of me is terrified," she said.

"I am still scared of him and I hate that, because I still see him as this strong, scary person who had all this power over me as a child."

CHANTELLE HAMILTON

Ms Daly (nee Hamilton) told news.com.au she was drugged, assaulted and photographed by Guider when she was just six-years-old, along with her childhood friend.

The abuse occurred while Guider, an amateur expert on Aboriginal rock art and cave sites, worked as a babysitter.

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He would visit the home of Chantelle's friend, in Manly, one of Sydney's famed surf spots, and would care for the two little girls while their mothers were out.

The convicted sex offender would then sedate them and drive them to public places, where he would sexually assault them.

"He would take us on these outings to public places like pools, beaches and forests," Ms Daly said.

When questioned by police, the girls could only remember certain parts of their ordeal, depending on how heavily drugged they were at the time.

"One of us would be more aware, it just depended when the drugs hit you," she said.

The little girls' evidence was instrumental in convicting their babysitter of child sexual abuse.

Chantelle Daly (nee Hamilton) was just six-years-old when she was assaulted. Photo / Supplied
Chantelle Daly (nee Hamilton) was just six-years-old when she was assaulted. Photo / Supplied

SAMANTHA KNIGHT

Following his arrest, Guider accepted a plea deal in 1996, avoiding a highly publicised court trial.

In 2001, while in prison, he confessed to drugging, molesting and killing nine-year-old Sydney girl, Samantha Knight, for which he received an additional prison sentence.

The little girl, from Bondi, disappeared in 1986 and sparked one of Australia's largest missing child cases at the time.

In his Supreme Court trial, Guider claimed he had only intended to sedate Samantha and sexually assault her, but gave her too much temazepam, which killed her.

The convicted sex offender said he buried Samantha in a park in Woollahra, in Sydney's eastern suburbs, but dug her tiny body up and moved it when he noticed tradesmen working too close to her final resting place.

While Guider was busy relocating his victim's body, police were desperately searching neighbourhoods, bushland and beaches for Samantha, distributing posters and pamphlets for months.

Police even dressed up a mannequin in Samantha's outfit to remind witnesses who had been in the street at the time she disappeared.

The case drew on for 15 years before coming to a close.

Samantha's mother, Tess Knight, recently told The Daily Telegraph she was encouraged by the NSW government's application to keep her daughter's killer behind bars.

Under state law, serious sex offenders can be kept in prison beyond their sentence expiration.

"I want that man to be incarcerated forever, who wouldn't — he's one of NSW's most dangerous criminals," she said.

Ms Knight was just 28-yeas-old when her daughter disappeared, and the frantic mother was front and centre in the media, handing out flyers and trying to spread the word about her daughter.

ON THE FRONTLINE

Now a mother-of-two, Ms Daly launched an online petition in February, urging the government to pass a law to prevent the release of convicted child killers who refuse to disclose the location of their victim's bodies.

Ms Daly told news.com.au she will be meeting with NSW Attorney-General Mark Speakman to implore him to revoke the paedophile's "disgusting sentence" and implement her draft legislation, which she has dubbed "Knight's Law" in memory of Samantha.

"This is a really easy thing for the public to get behind, because it's the right thing to do," she said.

Chantelle Daly will lead a march through Adelaide and Sydney, protesting against Guider's release. Photo / Supplied
Chantelle Daly will lead a march through Adelaide and Sydney, protesting against Guider's release. Photo / Supplied

Ms Daly will also fly to Sydney on May 26 to host a march in Bondi, the last place Samantha Knight was seen.

"There should be no second chances for people who harm children," she said.

"As a mother, I am furious that people like him continue to walk out of jail."

More than 104,000 people have signed her petition, which says is clear that things need to change.