Embarrassing footage of Thailand's king wearing a crop top while sporting "fake" tattoos have prompted authorities to threaten action against Facebook.

The video of King Maha Vajiralongkorn strolling around a shopping centre with a woman was widely shared on the social network.

But Thai authorities have threatened to press charges if it is still available at 10am tomorrow.

The video shows the 64-year-old monarch walking through a shopping centre with a woman. Photo / @zenjournalist
The video shows the 64-year-old monarch walking through a shopping centre with a woman. Photo / @zenjournalist

The footage was purportedly filmed in Munich, Germany, in July last year.

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It shows the monarch, who came to power last year following the death of his father, with a number of tattoos on his arms, stomach, and back.

However, the tattoos may actually be transfers as they are not the same as those seen in photographs taken at Munich airport earlier in 2016, one observer noticed.

The sleeve tattoo is shorter than in the airport photos and he has a tattooed belly in this video, which he did not have at the airport.

Vajiralongkorn, Nui and dog at Munich Airport in 2016. Photo / German news show Taff
Vajiralongkorn, Nui and dog at Munich Airport in 2016. Photo / German news show Taff

Under strict lese-majeste laws in Thailand, people can be jailed for up to 15 years for sharing material which is insulting to the monarchy.

The video has been geo-blocked by the social network, but Thai authorities say 131 pages containing the 'illicit' video are still available.

Takorn Tantasith, secretary-general of the National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission said: "If even a single illicit page remains, we will immediately discuss what legal steps to take against Facebook Thailand."

Last week the Thai Internet Service Provider Association emailed Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg calling for the posts to be blocked, the Bangkok Post reports.

The Worldwide Movement for Human Rights has said 105 people have been arrested under the strict laws since May 2014.

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The back 'tattoos' favoured by the king are available from online websites such as Alibaba. Photo / Facebook
The back 'tattoos' favoured by the king are available from online websites such as Alibaba. Photo / Facebook

President Dimitris Christopoulos said: "In less than three years, the military junta has generated a surge in the number of political prisoners detained under lèse-majesté by abusing a draconian law that is inconsistent with Thailand's international obligations."

The monarch is the only son of King Bhumibol Adulyadej, who died last year at the age of 88.

After spending much of his life outside the public eye, Maha Vajiralongkorn was catapulted into the limelight as future king of a politically fractured nation.

The 64-year-old inherits one of the world's richest monarchies, yet the untested heir has enormous shoes to fill following the October 13 death of his father, who charmed a nation that came to see him as a compassionate and unflashy monarch.

Bhumibol's popularity and moral authority helped him wield vast influence during his seven-decade reign, despite the few legal powers granted to the constitutional monarch.
But he has left behind a deeply polarised country, trapped in a cycle of political protests, coups by an arch-royalist military and entrenched inequality.

Under strict lese-majeste laws in Thailand, people can be jailed for up to 15 years for sharing material which is insulting to the monarchy. Photo / @zenjournalist
Under strict lese-majeste laws in Thailand, people can be jailed for up to 15 years for sharing material which is insulting to the monarchy. Photo / @zenjournalist

Vajiralongkorn does not enjoy his father's level of popularity and has spent much of his life overseas, particularly in Germany.

Rumours over his private life have also trailed him, gilded by three-high profile divorces and a recent police corruption scandal linked to the family of his previous wife.

After his father's passing, he shocked many by requesting to delay his ascension to the throne.

That announcement was delivered on his behalf by junta chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha, who said the prince wanted more time to grieve with the nation.

In the past, heirs have typically been proclaimed king shortly after the throne is vacated.