It's a spectacular location that visitors just can't get enough of, but some are putting their lives on the line here despite a recent tragedy.

The iconic Sea Cliff Bridge, in the northern Illawarra region of NSW an hour south of Sydney, has been a major tourist drawcard since it opened in 2005.

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The AU$49 million bridge was built after ongoing issues with the road which originally curved alongside the dramatic cliffs. Frequent rockfalls posed a danger to motorists and would also force the closure of the road for months at a time while cleared.

The jaw-dropping structure, which has featured in television commercials, also sports an impressive walkway. But the stunning views has sadly not been enough to stop some visitors from venturing off the path and onto the surrounding cliffs in the hunt for the perfect photo.

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Tragically, a young man died after falling off a cliff at the popular site on Saturday afternoon. The Sydney man, in his 20s, had reportedly been walking with friends near the southern end of the bridge at Clifton when he slipped and fell more than 40m on to rocks below.

He died at the scene.

Shockingly, just 24 hours after the man's death, a local spotted four people walking towards the same location, and another 10 people were seen close to the edge yesterday, the Sydney Morning Herald reported.

The resident said she was "really upset" at the sight.

"I yelled out to them, 'Hey guys get out of there, someone died up there yesterday," she said.

"They just waved it off and laughed like it was a joke. It's as much the attitude of people walking up there as it is inadequate fencing and signage."

It was a horrifying long weekend for the region, with another man drowning at nearby Stanwell Park Beach yesterday.

Death by selfie

While there was no suggestion the man who died on the cliff on the weekend was taking a selfie, it's clear from a look at Instagram posts of visitors to the site that tourists take risks at the iconic site.

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The news comes as scientists call for "no selfie zones" to be put in place at popular tourist attractions around the world, after a new study found that selfies have claimed the lives of 259 people around the world between 2011 and 2017.

Drowning, being hit by cars or falling were the most common causes of death by selfie, The Sun reported.

"Selfies are themselves not harmful, but the human behaviour that accompanies selfies is dangerous," Dr Agam Bansal from the India Institute of Medical Sciences, who led the research, said.

"Individuals need to be educated regarding certain risky behaviours and risky places where selfies should not be taken.

"'No selfie zone' areas should be declared across many tourist areas, (especially) places such as water bodies, mountain peaks and over tall buildings to decrease the incidence of selfie-related deaths," he said.