Research has shown that travellers are seeking an escape from the pressures of online life more than ever.

The "digital detox" trend has taken off in recent years, with experiences labelled with buzzwords like "black hole resorts", "offline escape retreats", or "dead zone holiday options". It seems the digital world is getting a little bit too much for some of us.

If you've been feeling a little too attached to your smartphone or computer, here are a few places around the world where they won't see much action:

Tristan da Cunha

Tristan Da Cunha is the worlds most remote inhabited island. Photo / Getty Images
Tristan Da Cunha is the worlds most remote inhabited island. Photo / Getty Images

This is the world's most remote inhabited island – a British overseas territory over 2816 km off the coast of South Africa. The nearest bit of land is St Helena – and that's a whopping 2430 km away.

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The island is home to around 270 residents and as you can imagine, there's no mobile network at all.

If you're looking to get away from it all on Tristan da Cunha, you'll need to do some careful planning. There's no airstrip on the island, so visitors must arrive by boat. While there are no visas required, all visitors must seek permission from the Tristan government.

Tourism activities here include fishing excursions, walks, climbs and even golf. Tours of the island's fish processing factory are also available for visitors.

China

Addicted to social media? China's Great Firewall will put a stop to that. Photo / Getty Images
Addicted to social media? China's Great Firewall will put a stop to that. Photo / Getty Images

If social media is your main digital vice, a trip to China could be just what the doctor ordered. Most western social media platforms are banned in the country, due to a barrier that's been dubbed "The Great Firewall of China".

That means no Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, Snapchat, Google+, Blogspot and more. The Great Firewall also blocks a number of media sites, including the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and even Netflix. Almost all porn sites are also blocked.

And if you've really got a problem, China even has boot camps for the internet-addicted.

Green Bank, West Virginia

Rural countryside in Green Bank, West Virginia. Photo / Getty Images
Rural countryside in Green Bank, West Virginia. Photo / Getty Images

This small US town is located within a 13,000-square-mile area known as the National Radio Quiet Zone – as Green Bank is home to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and operates the world's largest radio telescope.

As a result, all wireless signals are forbidden – that means no cellphones, WiFi, cordless phones, Bluetooth devices and even garage door openers – as they would interfere with the telescope's important work. There's even a surveillance truck on patrol to catch anyone breaking the rules.

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If you're a star-gazer, a trip to Green Bank could be just the digital detox for you. The town is also close to the Snowshoe Mountain ski resort.

Milford Sound, New Zealand

Your smartphone won't get much action in Milford Sound. Photo / Getty Images
Your smartphone won't get much action in Milford Sound. Photo / Getty Images

You don't need to travel far to get away from it all. New Zealand still has plenty of cellphone dead zones – and some of them are in our most beautiful tourist destinations. There is no cell reception in Milford Sound and other areas of the West Coast, so if you're looking for a digital detox amongst stunning scenery, without leaving the country, this is the spot for you.

Restival

One company has designed a festival around the digital detox concept. Restival's mind, body and spirit retreats offer a respite from technology and a chance to bond with your fellow humans, in stunning locations like the Sahara, or the Arizona desert.

But a lack of technology doesn't mean you'll be left with nothing to do. Restival events include musicians, guest speakers, yoga classes and other workshops.

Northern Territory, Australia

Wild Bush Luxury's Bamurru Plains sits on the edge of Kakadu National Park. Photo / Getty Images
Wild Bush Luxury's Bamurru Plains sits on the edge of Kakadu National Park. Photo / Getty Images

Once you're out of Alice Springs, you won't find much cell phone reception in the outback areas of Australia's Northern Territory. For safety reasons, it's recommended you carry a satellite phone on a road trip – these can be rented in Darwin. You don't want to break down in the middle of the desert without one, but you probably won't be able to check Facebook on it.

For a digital detox that doubles as a luxury stay, book in at Wild Bush Luxury's Bamurru Plains on the edge of Kakadu National Park – it's a residence that's proud of its lack of WiFi or cell reception.