A German designed high-tech car stacking system in a new development is a residential first that promises to solve apartment parking woes, according to the realtor.

As well as beautiful design elements including gold tiles in the foyer and a stunning art deco-style spiral staircase, the new Oasis Apartments on the edge of Myers Park have a super-practical space-saving car stacker in the basement that allows twice the number of parks as similar builds.

Drivers pull into a secure garage, leave their car, enter the foyer and at the touch of a button the car is lowered into the basement and placed in its allocated spot.

When the car is needed another button is pushed, the machine collects the car and minutes later it is returned to the garage - conveniently facing the road.

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The same technology has been used in two large commercial buildings in the city and Parnell but not in apartments before now.

"It takes away all the risk of dents and dings and theft and means we have been able to provide twice the number of carparks for this building," said Virgil Roberts of Fresh Realty.

"Some of the apartments have two car parks each, which would have been impossible with a traditional carpark."

Carparking in Auckland city is in short supply - and expensive. Last year a single carpark in an apartment building near Britomart sold for $265,000.

Roberts said most of the owners of the 14 apartments already sold are baby boomers who are downsizing, still enjoy "lattes and whiskey" and want something different from living in the 'burbs.

It's exactly what the refurbished St Kevin's Arcade and nearby Karangahape Rd provide.

"People still need their cars to get around but there is also a heck of a lot to do within walking distance," Roberts said.

"They want the buzz of the city but once you get up into the apartment it is by the park, it's sunny and it is really quite serene."

Virgil and Fay Roberts of Fresh Realty loved the development so much they are keeping two apartments they have combined to double the floor space.

And the couple, who own a colour-filled home nearby, made sure everything at Oasis had a point of difference.

"There is the brick front, which is quite unusual for an apartment but it goes with the environment with the older buildings," Virgil said.

"The foyer could have been terracotta tiles but we found these amazing ceramic tiles with a brass coating and instead of black in the staircase we have the turquoise teal."

As with the car stacker, new technology was used to reinvent the traditional fire escape doors.

A stair pressurisation unit that draws clean air from outside and pushes smoke out of the stairwell is used instead of fire-stop doors.

"It cost $250,000 more to design and build the spiral staircase instead of your usual utilitarian style but that's what sets this building apart from others," Roberts said.

"It really is something special in a very special part of town."

Apartments in the Oasis range from $785,000 for a one-bedroom unit to $2.5m for a penthouse.