New Zealand, rejoice, you have a netball team to savour.

Sixteen years after New Zealand's last World Cup crown in Jamaica, Silver Ferns coach Noeline Taurua has inspired a fairytale triumph in Liverpool.

On Monday morning (NZ time), the Silver Ferns dethroned Australia, 11-time champions and winners of the last three World Cup titles.

This 52-51 triumph seemed so much more improbable than any before. Last year, the Ferns hit rock bottom with a disastrous Commonwealth Games campaign.

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But thanks to Taurua's incredible 11-month transformation, they are now top of the netball world.

Former Silver Ferns coach Ruth Aitken, who saw them to success in 2003, hailed Taurua and the team's performance.

The Vitality Netball World Cup 2019 winners, New Zealand, during the medal ceremony. Photo / Photosport
The Vitality Netball World Cup 2019 winners, New Zealand, during the medal ceremony. Photo / Photosport

"She was very clear on her vision and of the players that needed to be brought back into the fold for her to execute that vision," she said.

"But the great thing about Noeline is she grows the players' confidence, she allows them to blossom, and that is what you saw - a team that knew their roles, had confidence in each other, had legs to last and just went for it."

But if there are three figures, other than Taurua, who deserve this success more than anyone, it's Ferns captain Laura Langman, veteran defender Casey Kopua and star shooter Maria Folau.

Since 2007, that trio has stomached three successive World Cup final losses to Australia.

Laura Langman in action during the tense Netball World Cup decider. Photo / Photosport
Laura Langman in action during the tense Netball World Cup decider. Photo / Photosport

"Those three key players are still playing really good netball so it's not like they are bringing out the old girls that are rattling around," Aitken said.

"Even though [Taurua] called them the fossils they hardly play like fossils."

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Ferns captain Laura Langman said the win was "really special for the fossils".

"Because it's highly likely we won't be here, we'll be on the other side of the fence" Langman said in reference to her last World Cup.

While Kopua said it actually felt like a fairytale.

With the treasured, elusive goal medal draped around her neck, she said;

"I'll keep it on for now. I think I might sleep in it. I'll definitely find somewhere at home so it can remind me every day.

"To finally get the win, it's pure satisfaction. It's going to look good with all the other medals. We've never had this."

Casey Kopua and her daughter Maia celebrating the win. Photo / Photosport
Casey Kopua and her daughter Maia celebrating the win. Photo / Photosport

Kopua was the world champion star until her three-year-old daughter Maia stole the show.

As Kopua answered questions on Sky Sports following the thrilling one-goal victory, Maia began licking her mum's neck and shoulder.

"Do you like the taste of sweat?" the BBC interviewer asked Maia, while her mum explained that she liked the saltiness.

Meanwhile Folau has been off limits to media for weeks, due to the controversy surrounding her support for husband Israel's religious views, Taurua made her importance clear.

"We're so happy she's part of our team," Taurua said. "One of our things is looking after each other on and off the court. She has such a long history with our sport and still has twinkletoes on that baseline. I'm really happy she was able to do the job.

"She's one in a million. No one plays the game like her, or can shoot like her."

Maria Folau and teammates celebrate the spectacular win. Photo / Photosport
Maria Folau and teammates celebrate the spectacular win. Photo / Photosport

Whatever the future holds, the Ferns fossils can now rest easy.

Although the players would say the glory of being crowned a World Champion is priceless, tournament officials have confirmed that there was no prize money up for grabs - despite The Blacks Caps' splitting $3 million as runners up of the Cricket World Cup.

While Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern was quick to congratulate the Ferns, when questioned about the inequality she said she hadn't had a chance to look at the sports codes.

"I know this is an issue generally around the equity of treatment between different codes, particularly different genders in sport - that our minister of sport has been very focused on.

"But as a general principle I think New Zealanders would like to see fair acknowledgement of our sportspeople when they reach the top of their code - and that should include netball."

Ardern said she was very proud of the team.

"I thought it was fantastic. I have always been glad as both a player but also as an observer when a game is particularly tense, and it's quite a short match, because everyone would have been on the edge of their seats.

"But that last half, obviously particularly the last quarter, was phenomenal," she said.

"I think people want to see recognition of that, and that would include, I imagine, having a chance to welcome them and the cup home."