The Black Caps are set to give their coaching staff a boost ahead of the Cricket World Cup.

The Herald understands that former Black Caps wicketkeeper Luke Ronchi will be joining the New Zealand setup as a fielding coach for the tournament.

Ronchi retired from international cricket in 2017, and has since enhanced his reputation as one of the world's best Twenty20 freelancers, having most recently played in the Pakistan Super League.

The 37-year-old was part of the Black Caps squad as a player in the 2015 World Cup, but is now set to link up with the coaching staff to provide his expertise in the United Kingdom.

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It is believed that Ronchi will join head coach Gary Stead, batting coach Craig McMillan, bowling coach Shane Jurgensen and strength and conditioning coach Chris Donaldson in forming the core of the coaching staff that will support the 15-man squad as they strive for glory at the World Cup, which starts in late May.

New Zealand batsmen Corey Anderson and Luke Ronchi, during the first Pool A match between New Zealand and Sri Lanka, at the ICC Cricket World Cup in 2015. Photo / Alan Gibson.
New Zealand batsmen Corey Anderson and Luke Ronchi, during the first Pool A match between New Zealand and Sri Lanka, at the ICC Cricket World Cup in 2015. Photo / Alan Gibson.

The Black Caps have regularly called upon specialist coaches in the past to add value to the current coaching group, with Jimmy Pamment and Heinrich Malan both part of the coaching group for the one-day series against India to help out with fielding training.

Pamment is currently working in the Indian Premier League as fielding coach for the Mumbai Indians, while Malan stepped down as Central Districts head coach at the end of the domestic season, leading to speculation that he could replace McMillan, who is moving on from the national side after the World Cup.

Ronchi's input could have extra value for the wicketkeepers in the World Cup squad, with the expected selections of Tom Latham and Tom Blundell indicating the importance of glovework for this group.

While Latham will likely play in every game at the Cup if fit, the emergence of Blundell as a World Cup option, despite an unflattering domestic record with the bat, suggests that his supposedly superior glovework is the reason he is set to get the nod over the likes of Tim Seifert.

Fielding as a whole will also continue to be a priority for the Black Caps. Usually sure-handed in the field, there were several sloppy performances over the summer, with too many chances going to ground for Stead's liking.

With Ronchi set to lend his experience, the Black Caps will be hoping that fewer chances go begging as they set their sights on bringing home the Cup.