Yesterday, he gave comfort to thousands who attended an emotional prayer service a week after 50 people were killed as they worshipped in two Christchurch mosques.

Today, All Blacks star Sonny Bill Williams gave comfort to those injured in one of the worst terrorist attacks in modern history.

Williams, who is Muslim, and fellow All Black Ofa Tu'ungafasi spent time with some of the mass shooting victims at Christchurch Hospital today, shaking hands, posing for selfies and offering words of comfort.

Among those to meet the rugby stars was Nazril Omar, one of three Malaysians injured when a gunman entered the mosque during Friday prayers eight days ago.

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According to Malaysian media Omar received wounds to his feet and back, but he was in a stable condition within two days of the mass shooting.

Williams had earlier put aside his natural shyness to take a leadership role after the terror attack.

The dual code legend attended an emotional Friday prayer in Hagley Park yesterday, close to Masjid Al Noor, where 42 of the victims were shot dead and the mosque where Williams prayed when he played for hometown team the Crusaders.

All Blacks star Sonny Bill Williams poses with nurses during a visit to Christchurch Hospital. Photo / Kai Schwoerer / Getty Images
All Blacks star Sonny Bill Williams poses with nurses during a visit to Christchurch Hospital. Photo / Kai Schwoerer / Getty Images

Later he spent several hours with a victim who has lost his brother in the terror attack. He thought he would be giving the strength but found it was coming the other way, Williams said.

He had pushed past his natural shyness to come to Christchurch because, as a proud Muslim, he wanted to show he was a proud New Zealander too, Williams said.

He thanked the New Zealand public and his "rugby boys" for all the support he has received.

"It's been humbling."

All Black Sonny Bill Williams comforts Temel Atacocugu, a survivor of the shootings at Al Noor mosque, during a visit to Christchurch Hospital. Photo / Kai Schwoerer / Getty
All Black Sonny Bill Williams comforts Temel Atacocugu, a survivor of the shootings at Al Noor mosque, during a visit to Christchurch Hospital. Photo / Kai Schwoerer / Getty

He also paid tribute to Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, whose response to the tragedy has won hearts around the world.

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But the 51-cap All Black also said yesterday that it was also time to talk about hatred and racism, as well as the "ugly side of politics".

His message was one of "unity, peace and love".

"The core message of what Islam is."