Cyclors have finally been banned for the next America's Cup.

Emirates Team New Zealand stunned both their rivals and the world when they entered the 35th America's Cup in Bermuda with a yacht that was fuelled by 'pedal-power' rather than conventional forms of grinding.

The Kiwi team's radical 'cyclor' innovation reported to produce 40 percent more power than their rivals, Oracle Team USA, and became one of a handful of factors that led Team New Zealand to victory.

However, in accordance to the AC75 Class Rule, that was published last week by the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron and Circolo della Vela Sicilia, crew members will be allowed to use only their hands as "primary force input devices" in the 2021 America's Cup in Auckland.

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Read more: Team New Zealand reveal AC75 Class Rule for 2021 America's Cup

Emirates Team New Zealand revealed their 'cyclor' innovation at the 35th America's Cup in Bermuda. Photo / Getty
Emirates Team New Zealand revealed their 'cyclor' innovation at the 35th America's Cup in Bermuda. Photo / Getty

The AC75 Class Rule, which is the blueprint for teams to design eligible yachts to compete in the 36th America's Cup, was developed over four months by Emirates Team New Zealand and the Challenger of Record – Luna Rossa.

It regulates all aspects of the boat to ensure fair and exciting racing, while leaving some freedom for innovation.

The Class Rule also outlined that there would be strict limitations on the number of components that can be built, including hulls, masts, rudders, foils, and sails, to promote subsequently less physical construction and testing.

The radical foil arms and canting system will be supplied along with the all-standing rigging, in order to save time and construction costs for the teams.

The mast will be a one design spar to a supplied drawing package and will see sail makers promptly back in business, with each boat being allowed 10 mainsails and 29 jibs.

AC75 concept for the boat for the America's Cup 2021. Photo / Supplied still from video
AC75 concept for the boat for the America's Cup 2021. Photo / Supplied still from video

The new AC75 will also come as good news for the carbon batten business with eight battens being allowed per main jib.

The crew size has been restricted to 11, without any quota specified for female sailors, and the sailing crew must average 90kg with a maximum weight of 990kgs.

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Read more: America's Cup: Team New Zealand's Dan Bernasconi backs conventional style of sailing

Emirates Team New Zealand design co-ordinator Dan Bernasconi, who believed the AC75 could be faster than the AC50's performance in Bermuda, described the Class Rule as "interesting".

"I think it's a pretty interesting rule because there isn't one specific area, I think there's quite a few areas from the hull shape ... the foils obviously, but also the wing control system and how the sails are controlled," he said.

The America's Cup teams will begin to reveal their designs by March 31 2019, when the first AC75 yachts can be launched.