The World Cup concludes tomorrow morning with a blockbuster final between the All Blacks and Wallabies. Gregor Paul, Ali Williams, Patrick McKendry, Nigel Yalden, Chris Rattue and Wynne Gray deliver their verdicts of the tournament.

Has this been the best Rugby World Cup so far?
GP: Probably, largely because the quality of rugby from the second-tier nations has massively improved and they present a meaningful challenge now. Also, the attacking intent of most teams has greatly increased. Most teams are now happier playing with the ball instead of without it.
AW: I think it's been the biggest to date with the most riding on it. But the beauty about World Cups is they all have a different and unique feel to them all related to the host country.
PM: No. For pure emotion and political significance (along with some of the rugby played), that honour has to go to South Africa 1995. This one might be the next best, though, thanks to the competitiveness of the pool matches and magnificent stadiums. The stadiums, crowds and volunteers looking after them and the media have been superb.
NY: Yes. The sport should improve over a four-year period and this World Cup has highlighted that improvements have been made, not only by the majority of top nations, but more importantly by the tier-two rugby countries as well.
CR: No. Nothing will beat the unsophisticated fun of the first one in 1987. The way rugby and the World Cup is rammed down our throats - or sold to us - as important for national identity etc has ruined the thrill. It is squashing diversity and what should be the joy of life that doesn't have to follow a script. Rugby is assuming far too much prominence for our own good.
WG: The 1995 tournament in South Africa remains my favourite - one country, plenty of drama, Jonah Lomu, food poisoning mystery, extra-time final. It was extraordinary all the way.

What has been the most memorable thing?

GP:

The size and energy of the crowds has been unforgettable. The majority of games have been played in massive stadiums that have been full, or just about, and the noise has been deafening. Even New Zealanders are learning to show some emotion.

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AW:

The improvements of rugby from all teams competing, along with the great upsets.

PM:

The All Blacks' 62-13 quarter-final victory over France was almost surreal in its brutal beauty. I thought Japan's victory over South Africa would be hard to top, but this one did it. Another thing which will live long in the memory was the atmosphere before, during and after Argentina's quarter-final win over Ireland at the Millennium Stadium. Incredible.

NY:

The amazing reaction to Japan knocking over South Africa on the opening weekend as it got everyone talking about the tournament.

CR:

Japan beating South Africa. An upset beyond anyone's imagination.

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WG:

Japan's win against the Springboks is the most staggering result in any World Cup. Japan kept surging back, refusing to give in while the Boks could not find any answer before Karne Hesketh's dramatic match-winner.

What has been the biggest surprise?

GP:

Just how bad England were. All that money and so much time to build a team and they were about as good as Georgia.

AW:

It continues to surprise me that at every World Cup we talk about how referees effect the results of the tournament and, yet, little is done to help them at major tournaments.

PM:

Running rugby and World Cups aren't usually associated with each other, but the expansive mindsets of most teams (bar South Africa), combined with the mostly beautiful late summer weather helped to make virtually every match a must-watch.

NY:

How reactive World Rugby were to crticism directed their way via the combination of traditional and social media - Hawkeye technology, the judicial system and Craig Joubert the prime examples.

CR:

Apart from Japan beating South Africa, nothing really.

WG:

England's continued lack of sophistication and monochromatic play.

Who has been the player of the tournament?

GP:

Ben Smith. Hasn't made a mistake, has run for miles, caught miracle high balls, made a million good decisions and inspired his team. He's done all that without ever forgetting that he's Ben from Accounts.

AW:

I don't think there has been one. A lot of guys have put their hand up but I don't think you will get another Jonah who stands out in a tournament like this.

PM:

All Blacks fullback Ben Smith. Reliable, stylish, dangerous on attack and safe on defence, brilliant under the high ball, unselfish and, above all, without possessing a conceited bone in his body.

NY:

David Pocock was hugely influential in Australia's run to the final and rightly deserving of all the plaudits and attention heaped on him prior to the final. He's my pick for World Rugby Player of the Year, too.

CR:

David Pocock. He is the single most vital player to any of the leading teams. He destroyed England, just as he destroyed South Africa in the last World Cup.

WG:

It's hard to go past David Pocock but Will Genia's return to form gave the Wallabies even better substance and his direction was crucial to their progress.

All Blacks coach Steve Hansen thinks the battle of the back rows will be won by the tight five's, and 'getting good front foot ball'. He is also hopeful that weather permitting 'we will see running rugby' but maybe the pressure will mean not too many tries.

Who has been the flop of the tournament?

GP:

Craig Joubert. He's a good referee, not prone to making mistakes and yet he made a big one when it mattered. The final this morning could have been New Zealand v Scotland otherwise.

AW:

I wouldn't say England were a flop. It was just a shame they didn't make the playoffs as that would have kept the home crowd really interested.

PM:

England. Poorly coached and selected, Stuart Lancaster's team were complete flops. The British newspapers predictably quickly lost their appetite for the tournament once England were knocked out. A quarter-final place at least for them would have continued the hype.

NY:

England. When you're the host nation and have home ground (Twickenham - the supposed fortress of English rugby) advantage for three of your four pool games, and then don't make it out of pool play, that is a belly flop off the highest diving board at the local swimming pool.

CR:

I don't like to use the word flop in this case, but the failure of the Pacific Island countries to fire is very disappointing.

WG:

Samoa were a real disappointment. This is danger time for them unless they overhaul their administration and rugby paths.

What change or innovation would you like to see at the 2019 World Cup?

GP:

Pedantic point this - but halfbacks like Will Genia who deliberately throw the ball at players trying to get back onside to win a penalty. That's got to stop.

AW:

It's a secret, starts with R and finishes with S (and they carry a whistle). They need help so let's find a solution.

PM:

Playoffs for those teams who miss out on the knockout matches. I would have liked to have seen more of Fiji and Japan, in particular. Why not have something meaningful for those teams to play to help fill in the long stretches without matches we've had over the last fortnight?

NY:

The system used to judge the man-of-the-match award could do with some tweaking.

CR:

Four less teams with the tournament shortened by a week. Although for New Zealand fans, the longer the tournament the better because the All Blacks are likely to have the greatest depth and resilience.

WG:

The draw being done in 2019 - the year of the event - and more games in the last fortnight.

Who has been the personality of the tournament?

GP:

Steve Hansen. Relaxed and honest with endless one-liners. Asked before the game against France whether he had anything up his sleeve, he replied: "Only my arm."

AW:

Nigel Owens, as he really seems to be enjoying himself when he is running the show.

PM:

Eddie Jones, Michael Cheika and Steve Hansen all have claims here, but I'm going with Jones, the Aussie in charge of Japan heading to South Africa to coach the Stormers. Jones - clearly a great coach with his ability to mould a team such as Japan into one of the best-drilled sides at the tournament - struck just the right mix of erudite, cheeky, and controversial. A class act whom England would do well to sign as soon as possible.

NY:

Michael Cheika. That larger-than-life personality mixed with the undeniable fact the man can coach is great not only for Australian rugby but also for world rugby. Characters like that draw people to the game.

CR:

There hasn't been one, not a genuine individual star to excite the masses so far which says something (not good) about rugby. The Argentine team have stood out, though. They have gone against the trend and opened up their style of game. The Pumas have excellent playmakers and like to put runners into gaps. They make rugby still look like fun, and to hell with obsessing error rates. It won't last, of course, as the pressure goes on to turn their rise into trophies.

WG:

Watching Michael Cheika has been a gas - seeing him fight his explosive temperament and dead-batting questions away.