Eden Park tomorrow is likely the last time a group of All Black legends will pull on the famous jersey in NZ. How will they will be judged in the pantheon of rugby?

Richie McCaw

Debut v Ireland, 2001, Dublin
141 matches
135 starts
27 tries
135 points
124 wins, 14 defeats, 2 draws

Richie McCaw leads by example. Photo / Brett Phibbs
Richie McCaw leads by example. Photo / Brett Phibbs

A three-time World Rugby Player of the Year, the man who led the All Blacks to their World Cup victory on a broken foot, a player on the verge of breaking the record in terms of tests played, someone who turned down a knighthood because it wouldn't have been a good look while he was still playing - there is little more that can be said about McCaw and the impact he has made not only for the All Blacks but New Zealand as a whole. He is the country boy comfortable on the big stage, someone who delivers time and again for his team despite being a foul-play target for frustrated players not as skilful as he is. He is also modest and rarely puts a foot wrong in terms of his public profile. Now he just needs to lead the All Blacks to back-to-back World Cup victories. No pressure.

- Patrick McKendry

Tony Woodcock

Debut v Wales, 2002, Cardiff
114 matches
102 starts
9 tries
45 points
98 wins, 15 defeats, 1 draw

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Tony Woodcock scores 'that try'. Photo / Brett Phibbs
Tony Woodcock scores 'that try'. Photo / Brett Phibbs

From the beginning, the word was out that North Harbour had uncovered a can-do frontrower of world class ability who operated without fuss. Nothing has changed. Scrum forces are immense these days and to even survive so long is a feat in itself. Woodcock has mainly scrummed superbly and does a competent although not explosive job elsewhere. He made a lengthy run to score one of the most famous and important tries in All Blacks history, yet even there he has been overshadowed by Stephen Donald's World Cup final penalty.

- Chris Rattue

If you ask the All Blacks players and the head coach Steve Hansen who is perhaps the world's greatest player (if not the modern era) the name cried out is Richie McCaw.

Keven Mealamu

Debut v Wales, 2002, Cardiff
125 matches
77 starts
12 tries
60 points
107 wins, 16 defeats, 2 draws

Keven Mealamu is an Eden Park icon. Photo / Greg Bowker
Keven Mealamu is an Eden Park icon. Photo / Greg Bowker

Generous and giving are all part of Keven Mealamu's spirit. He's loyal to the core and tough on himself when it comes to delivering for the All Blacks. He is an Eden Park icon, someone who should be remembered for his deeds on the famous ground with equal attachment as his predecessor Sean Fitzpatrick. It is a great contradiction that Mealamu, such a humble, gentle, God-fearing family man, can turn into a bucket of aggression on the field. "What I get to do is pretty special," he said. "Rugby is so enjoyable - it looks after my family and me. I love it."

- Wynne Gray

Conrad Smith

Debut v Italy, 2004, Rome
87 matches
83 starts
25 tries
125 points
77 wins, 9 defeats, 1 draw

Conrad Smith has been highly effective in a massively physical position for more than 10 seasons. Photo / Getty Images
Conrad Smith has been highly effective in a massively physical position for more than 10 seasons. Photo / Getty Images

In a world of power runners and line breakers, Conrad Smith has been refreshingly different. He's never relied on his size or presence yet has managed to be highly effective in a massively physical position for more than 10 seasons. He defends with the power and accuracy of a bigger man. He's made plenty of line breaks and has been a superb distributor. If Frank Bunce and Smith were in their prime, it would be a close run thing as to who would get the nod to play for the All Blacks.

- Gregor Paul

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Ma'a Nonu

Debut v England, 2003, Wellington
96 matches
81 starts
27 tries
135 points
84 wins, 10 defeats, 2 draws

Ma'a Nonu - the best All Black second-five of all time? Photo / Greg Bowker
Ma'a Nonu - the best All Black second-five of all time? Photo / Greg Bowker

It took Ma'a Nonu the better part of four years to become a regular All Black. He was a touch wild and erratic in those early years, but he was prepared to work hard and fully commit to improving his game. That perseverance and determination indicated his depth of character and is a major reason why he is one of the great second-fives. Nonu is the king of the collision and while it's not pretty, it is hugely important. But he's way more than smash and bash. His passing is excellent - only Aaron Smith throws a better long ball. He's an astute decision-maker. For eight seasons he's been world class - a critical part of the All Blacks' armoury. The best All Black second-five of all time? Certainly close to it.

- Gregor Paul

Dan Carter

Dan Carter is the benchmark for all future New Zealand first-fives. Photo / NZME
Dan Carter is the benchmark for all future New Zealand first-fives. Photo / NZME

Debut v Wales, 2003, Hamilton
105 matches
99 starts
29 tries
265 conversions
269 penalties
6 drop goals
1500 points
92 wins, 12 defeats, 1 draw

Without question, the best first-five world rugby has seen. Best because, in his prime certainly, he was a player without weakness. His running game used to be equally dynamic but while it hasn't been seen as much in recent years, Carter in the course of his career has unequivocally proven he's a once-in-a-generation player. He is an all-time great, the benchmark for all future New Zealand first-fives.

- Gregor Paul
Overall record: 668 tests. 582 wins.