Australian captain Michael Clarke heaped praise on New Zealand's performance at the World Cup as the teams prepare for the transtasman final in Melbourne on Sunday.

Having seen off defending champions India by 95 runs in last night's second semifinal at the Sydney Cricket Ground, Clarke turned his mind to the final.

He singled out New Zealand's new ball bowling, through left armer Trent Boult and Tim Southee, as the most impressive aspect of their game.

"Their new ball bowling has been exceptional," Clarke said.

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New Zealand have been the form team of the competition, and certainly deserve to be in the final

"We experienced that in the game we played against them, and we've seen it throughout the tournament.

"They've been able to swing the ball in New Zealand, and even if it hasn't swung, they've bowled good areas.

"We are going to have to make sure we bat well."

New Zealand won a thriller in group play by one wicket at Eden Park on February 28. Boult, the leading wicket taker in the cup, ripped out five for one in his second spell to slice through Australia and dismiss them for 151.

Clarke knows New Zealand will have taken confidence from that result, but also pinpointed it as a turning point in the cup for Australia.

"It gave us a kick up the backside, and gave us a look at a team playing at the top of their game. Certainly from that day our attitude from that day has been exceptional.

"We've grabbed momentum and tried to run with it and I think that'll hold us in pretty good stead on Sunday."

Black Caps reaching final is no choke

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New Zealand have not played a game on the Melbourne Cricket Ground since....and Clarke reckons that, plus the ground's dimensions, are factors in Australia's favour.

"The fact conditions are different will certainly help us and we've played a fair bit of cricket throughout the summer at the MCG. Conditions are a lot different to what New Zealand have been playing in in New Zealand.

"But in saying that we are going to have to play our best cricket, no doubt about that. New Zealand have been the form team of the competition, and certainly deserve to be in the final."

How New Zealand take risks will be crucial and Australia have the advantage of knowing the wicket well and have three left arm fast bowlers in their armoury. That will certainly help them.

India's loss last night means New Zealand are the only team in the cup to be unbeaten, with eight wins from eight matches.

Indian skipper MS Dhoni laid off picking a favourite, pointing out limited-overs cricket is all about who plays better on one given day.

But he did make the point Australia's knowledge of the distinctive qualities of the MCG, with its huge outfield, is to their advantage.

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"In New Zealand you can get away with mistimed shots. In general you get very good wickets. Hamilton is one where it holds a bit, but other than that the wickets are fantastic.

"But when you come to Australia you get a bit of reverse swing and it can get slightly two-paced, and especially when you are talking about the MCG.

"How New Zealand take risks will be crucial and Australia have the advantage of knowing the wicket well and have three left arm fast bowlers in their armoury. That will certainly help them."

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Australia rattled up 328 for seven last night, on the back of a splendid century by Steven Smith, his fourth in the last 17 ODI innings.

They had a wobble late in the innings but fast bowler Mitchell Johnson's unbeaten 27 off only nine balls, gave them a final push.

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India began well but lost several wickets in quick succession which left them needing 133 off their final 10 overs with only five wickets standing.

Dhoni concede the better team won last night. When quizzed about his legacy in ODI cricket - remembering he led India to victory in the 2011 final - Dhoni gave them a flick.

"You should do some nice research on that, take a few days and my advice would be whatever you decide, write the complete opposite and that will be the facts."

His legacy ''and what people think of me as a player, frankly for me it doesn't really matter", he added.

"I play for the enjoyment of the game and I don't really have to do anything with the amount of runs I've scored."

Dhoni's dismissal last night for 65 - run out by a direct throw from mid wicket by Glenn Maxwell - was the last hope gone for India. Dhoni didn't appear to run hard and made no attempt to stretch out for his crease.

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The Indian tail was quickly swept aside, with left armers James Faulkner (three wickets), Mitchell Starc and Mitchell Johnso (two each) taking the honours.

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