Travel insurers have revealed a spike in queries about pre-existing conditions in the wake of a high-profile case in which a woman didn't receive a payout after failing to reveal a pre-existing bowel condition.

Abby Hartley died in a Bali hospital earlier this month after becoming ill while on a second honeymoon.

Hartley is reported to have purchased insurance with Cover-More Travel Insurance through Air New Zealand but did not disclose her pre-existing bowel condition before she and her husband left for the holiday.

Chris White, chief executive of Southern Cross Travel Insurance - New Zealand's largest provider - said it had seen a 20 per cent increase in inquiries relating to pre-existing conditions since the case came to light.

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"It certainly has resonated with the public," he said. "There has certainly been an increase in awareness."

Allianz Partners which provides travel insurance policies via AA Travel, Helloworld, House of Travel, STA Travel, ANZ, and Expedia, said it too had seen a spike.

"Allianz Partners is currently receiving more calls across one day than the team usually receives in a week," said Will Ashcroft, Allianz Partners chief sales officer.

A spokeswoman for IAG, which provides travel insurance to the public through its State and AMI brands, confirmed it had heard from more travellers who wanted to share their medical history and ensure their details were correct.

"Anecdotally we've also heard that more customers are reading their policy documents and asking us questions to make sure they know what they're covered for."

The insurers all urged travellers to be upfront about pre-existing conditions.

Abby Hartley died in a Bali hospital earlier this month after becoming ill while on a second honeymoon. Photo / supplied
Abby Hartley died in a Bali hospital earlier this month after becoming ill while on a second honeymoon. Photo / supplied

Ashcroft said disclosure of pre-existing medical conditions was critical.

"Customers can complete a medical assessment to determine if cover is available or not.

"It is also extremely important to read the policy wording at the time of purchase. All policies are different so ensure you select one that meets your needs."

The spokeswoman for IAG said it strongly encouraged customers to be completely open and upfront about their health when purchasing travel insurance.

"There are many existing medical conditions that are automatically covered and many more we can cover after assessment.

"If travellers have any concerns or questions, they can contact us to ensure they travel knowing what their policy covers them for."

Southern Cross Travel Insurance's Chris White urged people to think about any treatments they may have received in the last three to five years.

"They should be asking themselves; have I had treatment? Or have I sought treatment?"

He said those who had already booked travel insurance and were concerned should get in touch with their insurer.

"The commonsense approach is to go back and declare anything."

While that could result in people paying a slightly higher premium White said it also bought peace of mind for people who had a medical condition and may end up sick while away.

If a person's situation changed between taking out the travel insurance and leaving on the trip they were also under an obligation to report it to the insurance company, he said.

"It is not a set and forget until you have actually departed."