Everywhere they went, Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, donned smiles and their happiness radiated during day two of their royal tour.

Auckland's grisly spring weather wasn't enough to dampen spirits, with hundreds of people making an effort to see the Prince of Wales and our future King.

The day kicked off in Mount Roskill at War Memorial Park where Prince Charles laid a wreath and later Camilla a floral tribute on the memorial for Niuean soldiers.

Following quick exchanges with guests and onlookers, some even flying Welsh flags, the pair moved on to Wesley Community Centre just around the corner.

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Local refugee woman Amina Shanko was presented a bicycle by the prince during his visit to the centre before he went on a tour of the premises.

There he met with Creative Collaborative Customs, where he was gifted a T-shirt and jokingly questioned whether he'd fit it before making his own.

Afterwards, the prince moved onto RYZ FM, who gave him a shoutout on-air and played a Bob Marley reggae track following a royal request.

A spokesman from the radio station said it was the first time he had met a royal and Prince Charles appeared to be fully engaged in the brief conversation.

"He was easy to talk to and said a lot in a short period of time. We even talked about house prices," the radio DJ said.

Elsewhere, Camilla sat with local children making arts and crafts โ€“ the Duchess created a pink Christmas ornament with yellow feathers and glitter.

From the centre, Prince Charles and Camilla went their separate ways, with the prince whisked away to Critical Design at Wesley Intermediate School.

A social enterprise, Critical Design was focused on achieving environmental sustainability using innovative technology to turn waste into new materials.

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Prince Charles presents a bicycle to local refugee woman Amina Shanko. Photo / Jason Oxenham
Prince Charles presents a bicycle to local refugee woman Amina Shanko. Photo / Jason Oxenham

Old car bumpers, plastic pipes, fishing nets and wood were among the waste recycled into things such as small tables, stools, and even kayaks.

From there, the prince and his convoy headed to Waimauku with suburban roads and the Northwestern Motorway shut down completely for smooth travelling.

Joining up with his wife, the pair gathered at Hunting Lodge Winery where they were invited to taste the local wines.

Helensville farmer Richard Kidd was there also, showing off some of his Kaipara Farm lamb meat.

"We got a random call out of the blue about it ... it was a bit of an honour," Kidd, a farmer of 40 years, told the Herald.

"We spoke about the lamb and I thanked him for being an advocate of wool, which is down on price at the moment. However, the price of lamb is doing very well."

Prince Charles meets members of the public after laying a wreath at Mt Roskill War Memorial Park. Photo / AFP
Prince Charles meets members of the public after laying a wreath at Mt Roskill War Memorial Park. Photo / AFP

Later, their Royal Highnesses arrived at RNZAF Whenuapai to present the Queen's Colour.

The Queen's Colour was given as recognition of the RNZAF's achievements and was the highest honour the Sovereign could present.

After greeting the Parade, Prince Charles stood on a dais while the retiring Queen's Colour was marched through the Escort Squadron and off the Parade.

Prince Charles and Camilla attend a wreath-laying ceremony at Mt Roskill War Memorial Park. Photo / AFP
Prince Charles and Camilla attend a wreath-laying ceremony at Mt Roskill War Memorial Park. Photo / AFP

The new Queen's Colour was laid over drums on the parade ground before the Prince, blessed and gave a karakia.

"Her Majesty is giving you her Colour in the knowledge you will guard it well," the Prince said.

He gave his "heartfelt" wishes for the RNZAF's future endeavours, and Air Vice-Marshal Andrew Clark expressed his gratitude.

Prince Charles meets Ariane Mes, 11, and Honor Cummins, 10. Photo / Dean Purcell
Prince Charles meets Ariane Mes, 11, and Honor Cummins, 10. Photo / Dean Purcell

School friends Ariane Ames, 11, and Honor Cummins, 10, were lucky enough to speak briefly with Prince Charles and shake his hand.

"It was really cool ... it was hard to imagine really, we were telling our friends at school and they didn't believe us," they laughed.

Tomorrow, Prince Charles and Camilla's royal tour of New Zealand continues in Auckland before moving to Waitangi on Wednesday.