Spark Sport says it is confident it will deliver reliable coverage of the Rugby World Cup as the tournament moves into the knock-out stage.

It acknowledged that streaming of the All Blacks match against South Africa on September 21 had failed but said yesterday that the 31 other matches so far had streamed successfully to more than 100,000 customers.

It was continuing to work with those having problems. Technicians were doing free visits to assess in-home technology set-ups and providing an alternative streaming device.

"In almost all cases our technicians have assisted with in-home set-up or device improvements and have walked out the door with the customer now having a good streaming experience," a spokesman said.

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This comes in the week Spark Sport delivered a blow to Sky by winning the rights to broadcast New Zealand cricket for six years.

Former All Black Craig Innes said he would judge whether he was getting a better service when he watches the knock-out matches, which begin in a week.

Innes vented on Facebook last month after much of a match he was watching was ruined by buffering and picture-freeze.

Craig Innes in his All Black days. Photo / Getty
Craig Innes in his All Black days. Photo / Getty

The problem hadn't been the quality of broadband, he said, as he'd had problems watching in three different parts of the country. "It's that [the service] hadn't been up to scratch".

"Spark offered help and they did follow up but the test will be when I watch the play-off matches."

While the cancellation of matches due to Typhoon Hagabis was frustrating, for Innes it was put in perspective by the fact that a Japanese partner in his sports management business was busy putting sandbags on his roof to protect his house.

"He's in Chiba prefecture [near Tokyo]. He knows what can happen, he's lost part of his roof in a typhoon before."

Although its refunds policy includes an event or series that is cancelled, Spark does not believe that a partial refund to Rugby World Cup Tournament Pass customers is warranted or would be expected by customers.

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"Our refund policy states that Spark Sport is not liable for any loss for any reason beyond our reasonable control."

As of Wednesday, Spark had earmarked 309 customers, with 100 home visits having been booked or completed to date.

Spark Sport is confident of much-improved streaming performance. Image / Supplied
Spark Sport is confident of much-improved streaming performance. Image / Supplied

A further 131 visits were pending, with the remaining customers having told Spark Sport their issue was resolved or they declined the in-home support.

An All Blacks training session proves popular with Japanese media in Beppu, Japan. Photo / Mark Mitchell
An All Blacks training session proves popular with Japanese media in Beppu, Japan. Photo / Mark Mitchell

Broadcasting, Communications and Digital Media Minister Chris Faafoi was critical of the streaming performance last month but said through a spokesman problems had largely been resolved. The exception related to individual customers' set-ups.

Meanwhile, a Facebook group of unhappy customers threatening to sue for $250 million has yet to file proceedings. They were updating their claim and aimed to file next week, the spokeswoman, who asked to be identified only as Tracy, said.

A Spark spokeswoman earlier said the company is comfortable it has satisfied its legal obligations.