Kiwis hit by a ball while watching a sports game would unlikely be able to take legal action, even if you were hit by an object from the field.

That's because the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) would provide you with financial support.

It comes after an Irish rugby fan lodged a personal injury claim against the Ireland Rugby Football Union (IRFU) after being hit by a ball during a game.

It's understood she was hurt after a ball was kicked into the crowd by a player during the All Blacks' historic loss to Ireland at Dublin's Aviva Stadium last November.

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But if someone was sitting in the crowd at a game in New Zealand and a flying ball hit them and broke their nose, ACC would cover it, said spokesman Nick Maslin.

"Depending on the injuries, of course, getting hit by a rugby ball … if you got hit hard enough [there would be cover] for sure," he said.

"You'd go to your general practitioner or if it was bad enough you'd probably be in A&E and you'd be covered from there on."

It would be unlikely to replicate the Ireland fan incident here because ACC prevents legal action to be taken against personal injury, Maslin said.

Auckland Stadiums asks patrons to pay attention to the game on the field to prevent any injuries. Photo / John Stone
Auckland Stadiums asks patrons to pay attention to the game on the field to prevent any injuries. Photo / John Stone

Auckland Stadiums, the organisation behind Mt Smart Western Springs and North Harbour stadiums, said patron safety was "very important" to them.

"For this reason every event we deliver is subject to comprehensive risk assessments as part of our health and safety planning," director James Parkinson said.

"This informs the specific safety measures in place for each of our events and St John staff are present at our larger attended events to assist with any injuries that may arise."

Auckland Stadiums were yet to record any injury from a rugby or league ball, Parkinson said, but encouraged all patrons to pay attention to the field when attending a game.

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Meanwhile, in 2014 an All Blacks spectator was injured when a firework which was fired went astray and crashed into the crowd at Eden Park.

Blood splatters in the stands at Eden Park. Photo / Supplied
Blood splatters in the stands at Eden Park. Photo / Supplied

The injured spectator, a woman, was taken to hospital but a man and a third person returned to their seats after treatment.

A day later, another spectator described the scene of panic as the deafening boom from the fireworks caused parts of the crowd to duck below their seats.

"When those explosions went off after the haka they gave us a hell of a fright. We all ducked. They were so loud," she said.

"Then immediately afterwards people in front started screaming and crying ... shocked people were looking round trying to see where all the blood had come from.

"There was blood splattered everywhere down the steps and chairs. I don't think people realised what had happened until the people got up, with blood streaming down their faces."