The Minister in charge of the response to the March 15 terror attacks in Christchurch says the Government is providing tailored, personalised help for victims of the attacks.

This comes after some of the victims injured in the attacks have spoken out about the Government falling short on some of its promises.

According to the New York Times, Temel Atacocugu, who suffered nine gunshot wounds on March 15, has asked Immigration New Zealand a number of times for his mother and nephew to join him in Christchurch from Turkey.

He needs them to help care for him but a month has passed since their visa applications were filed, and no answer has come, according to the publication.

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Zhiyan Basharati, a community organiser, told The Times at least half of those affected wanted to bring relatives who did not fit the criteria.

"The categories are very narrow, and every person comes with a story," she said.

"If you're disabled because of the shooting and your brothers come here to help you, your brother has a family, too."

But, in a statement, Immigration NZ Assistant General Manager Peter Elms said: "On 19 June 2019 INZ received visitor visa applications for two family members of a Turkish national who was a victim of the Christchurch shootings and those applications are currently being assessed. There has been no delay."

After the attack, the Government established a special visa category for victims "significantly affected by the terrorist attacks".

Megan Woods, the Minister in charge of coordinating the Government's response to the attack, said 216 family members of victims of the Christchurch shooting were granted visitor visas to enter New Zealand.

The Government approved most of those applications within 48 hours, she said in a statement.

The crowd applauds at the conclusion of the vigil for the 50 victims of the terror attacks in Hagley Park, Christchurch on March. 24. Photo / Mark Mitchell
The crowd applauds at the conclusion of the vigil for the 50 victims of the terror attacks in Hagley Park, Christchurch on March. 24. Photo / Mark Mitchell

"Conversations in the initial hours and days after the attack make it abundantly clear to me that each family had their own individual circumstances and needs."

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"It was very apparent to me that we would need a special approach to helping these people and their families."

The Government also provided welfare payments to victims in need and, as of June 10, $487,158 had been paid in additional emergency payments.

"These numbers are expected to increase as case managers work with families who may be newly eligible for the support agreed to by the Government," Woods said.

The New York Times also reported that many of the affected families have also questioned the method by which the more than $10 million raised from public donations is being distributed by Victim Support.

While the distribution of charitable funds is a matter for the NGOs involved, Woods said she has helped to bring people together so that victims can voice their concerns.

"In the two and a half months since the attacks, families of the deceased have received $74,000, injured victims $39,000 and all others present at the Mosques $12,000 each," she said.

"The government is providing tailored, personalised help for victims of the March 15 attack and their families."