Auckland Councillor Chris Darby has launched a petition that he hopes will "bring Fullers into line" following ongoing outrage about the ferry company's poor performance.

Darby says Auckland Transport should have oversight of the two ferry services that transports city commenters to and from Waiheke Island and Devonport.

"These services are integral to our public transport network and need to be responding to the needs of users, rather than maximising profits," he says.

The councillor says the two ferry services are the only part of Auckland's public transport network that are exempt from oversight of Auckland Transport.

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The two ferry services are the only part of Auckland's public transport network that are currently exempt from oversight of Auckland Transport, councillor says. Photo / File
The two ferry services are the only part of Auckland's public transport network that are currently exempt from oversight of Auckland Transport, councillor says. Photo / File

Currently, the services are privately operated and overseen exclusively by Fullers 360.

Darby says this needs to change as it is disadvantaging islanders for whom the service is a lifeline.

"We wish to make the Devonport and Waiheke services contracted provisions under the Land Transport Management Act 2003, to ensure fare structure integration and consistent levels of service with Auckland Transport oversight," he said.

At 4.20pm today, the petition had received nearly 300 signatures.

This comes as lack of space on the Waiheke ferry and unexplained cancellations has seen commuters and staff go head-to-head.

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Passengers desperate not to be left on the dock were reportedly lashing out at crew, including pushing and shoving Fullers workers, and shouting abuse if the ferry was full.

In one instance queuing customers even "held the gangway hostage" by refusing to move aside while there were still spare seats on the departing ferry - left empty when there aren't enough staff to meet health and safety ratios - delaying the boat and leaving staff shaken.

"Some crew are refusing to work on the Waiheke run because they are scared ... I know some who calls in sick rather than work that shift," a former Fullers staff member told the Herald on Sunday last month.

Meanwhile, commuters have described being left in the cold and rain because ferries were cancelled without warning, and about their children missing netball and rugby games on the mainland, to huge disappointment.

Ferry commuters described being left in the cold and rain because ferries were cancelled without warning. Photo / File
Ferry commuters described being left in the cold and rain because ferries were cancelled without warning. Photo / File

Fullers have responded to the fury saying they have heard loudly and strongly that some customers are unhappy.

"This really concerns us.

"We do work within a natural environment, so there are some things beyond our control, like fog, but we do our very best to adapt when these arise," Mike Horne, Fullers CEO said last week.

The company says it has launched an "immediate review" of its operations and will investigate staffing levels, scheduling and better customer communication on the wharves.