The family behind New Zealand's oldest and best-known cycling brand has launched an e-bike range that aims to get more people on bikes, kids off devices and fewer cars on the road.

Kim Struthers - son of Avanti founder John Struthers - and brother-in-law Stephen James have launched Sinch, an e-bike range for children, commuters and adventure seekers.

Avanti was born in the early 80s when the Struthers children got into BMX racing and father John Struthers started building bike parts himself because of import restrictions.

The company went on to manufacture 10-speed road bikes and the Avanti brand, Italian for "moving forward", was born in 1985.

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Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge are gifted a bike for Prince George by John Struthers founder of Avanti after opening the Avantidrome. Photo / Richard Robinson
Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge are gifted a bike for Prince George by John Struthers founder of Avanti after opening the Avantidrome. Photo / Richard Robinson

Now Struthers and James see Sinch, like Avanti, as another mode of moving forward, getting families cycling together and more people on bike lanes and trails.

"We saw a gap in the market and so we decided to design something ourselves," Struthers said.

"We wanted to provide really top quality bikes with Shimano mid-drive motor and components but at an affordable price.

"One of our big focuses is getting families doing stuff together and the e-bikes help the kids keep up with their parents, or the other way around."

Struthers and James, who are both fathers of three, used their combined 50 years' experience and knowledge of cycling to design the bikes from scratch.

James also has "cycling in his blood" as a former New Zealand representative road and track rider and two decades working in the industry - including head of product development for Avanti until interests in the business were sold last year.

Sinch e-bikes were designed so families could adventure together. Photo / Supplied
Sinch e-bikes were designed so families could adventure together. Photo / Supplied

Features of the Sinch e-bike include a digital screen with easy to change modes, a removable battery, and a powerful intuitive pedal assist Shimano drive unit which helps sustain speeds up to 32km/h. The children's model runs at a slower 19km/h.

Struthers said the goal was to get more people on bikes.

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"Obesity is a big problem worldwide and so is traffic congestion so we wanted to create something that gets more people on bikes, off screens but we also wanted to make it a bit easier and more enjoyable for them," Struthers said.

James said even as a competitive cyclist he loved the freedom of the e-bike.

"You have your competitive side, but it gets to the stage where you just want to go out and enjoy yourself.

"That's what electric bikes have done. Customers try the bikes out and the ease and fun brings on the smile.''

The bikes still require pedal power but when the road gets tougher or the legs need a rest a press of a button gives the bike a boost.

"A fully charged battery can travel 150km on the economy mode which means the whole family can take in a pretty amazing adventure," James said.

The range, which is sold through parent company Delve DMD, will launch a more minimal commuter bike in the coming weeks.