Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has described co-ordinated bomb attacks on Sri Lankan churches and hotels as "devastating" and extended New Zealand's condolences to the grieving nation.

At least 207 people have been killed and 500 injured in the eight bomb blasts on Easter Sunday.

There are 115 New Zealanders registered in Sri Lanka, but no reports to date of any Kiwi victims.

"New Zealand condemns all acts of terrorism, and our resolve has only been strengthened by the attack on our soil on the 15th of March," Ardern said on Sunday night.

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"To see an attack in Sri Lanka while people were in churches and at hotels is devastating.

Sri Lankan Army soldiers secure the area around St Anthony's Shrine after a blast in Colombo. Photo / AP
Sri Lankan Army soldiers secure the area around St Anthony's Shrine after a blast in Colombo. Photo / AP

"New Zealand rejects all forms of extremism and stands for freedom of religion and the right to worship safely. Collectively we must find the will and the answers to end such violence.''

Ardern said she offered New Zealand's sympathy and support to Sri Lanka at this difficult time.

At least 207 people are confirmed dead and 500 others injured after the Easter Sunday terror attacks, which ripped simultaneously through a series of targets in multiple areas today.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs told the Herald 115 Kiwis are registered as being in the South Asian country.

The ministry was responding to reports of bomb blasts in and around the country's largest city, Colombo, and at a church at Batticaloa, on the east coast.

But government officials had received no reports of New Zealand citizens being caught up in the terror attacks.

"New Zealanders in Sri Lanka are advised to exercise a high degree of vigilance in public areas and to follow any advice issued by local authorities," an MFAT spokesperson said.

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"New Zealanders in Sri Lanka in need of consular assistance should contact the New Zealand High Commission in New Delhi on +91 11 468 83170."

An injured tourist talks to the local police officers in front of the National Hospital at Colombo. Photo / Getty Images
An injured tourist talks to the local police officers in front of the National Hospital at Colombo. Photo / Getty Images

Kiwis in the country are being asked to register their details at www.safetravel.govt.nz.

New Zealander Bill Inglis is on holiday in Sri Lanka, about an hour away from Colombo in Bentota.

The public-sector auditor said other tourists in the area are taking holiday life as per usual despite the attacks but he has changed his plans about visiting Colombo tomorrow.

Simultaneous explosions hit churches and hotels on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka, with the reports varying on the numbers of the dead and injured.

A Sri Lankan elderly woman is helped near St. Anthony's Shrine after a blast in Colombo. Photo / AP
A Sri Lankan elderly woman is helped near St. Anthony's Shrine after a blast in Colombo. Photo / AP

Sri Lanka security officials said six near-simultaneous blasts hit three churches and three hotels frequented by tourists.

Security forces inspect the St. Anthony's Shrine after an explosion hit St Anthony's Church in Kochchikade in Colombo. Photo / Getty Images
Security forces inspect the St. Anthony's Shrine after an explosion hit St Anthony's Church in Kochchikade in Colombo. Photo / Getty Images

AFP reported the death toll has reached 156 people, including 35 foreigners, according to police.

A Sri Lanka state-run newspaper, the Daily News, reported that more than 500 people have been hospitalised with injuries caused by the blasts.

An official said they suspect the blasts at two churches were carried out by suicide bombers.

"Eighty people have already been admitted, and more are still coming in," an official at the Colombo National Hospital earlier told AFP on condition of anonymity.

The nature of the explosions was not immediately clear.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan condemned the attacks, calling them "an assault on all of humanity".

In comments posted on Twitter, Erdogan offered his condolences to families of the victims and to the people of Sri Lanka.

The bombings are the worst violence in Sri Lanka since its civil war ended a decade ago.

Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said: "Regardless of the motive, the attack in Sri Lanka is the same as the traitorous attack in Christchurch: cowardly, barbaric and cruel."

He was referring to last month's attacks against two mosques in New Zealand during Friday prayers that killed 50 people.

National Party leader Simon Bridges expressed his shock and sympathy in a Twitter post tonight.

Russian President Vladimir Putin denounced the attacks on churches and hotels in Sri Lanka as "cruel and cynical".

In a telegram of condolences sent to his Sri Lankan counterpart, the Russian leader said Moscow remains a "reliable partner of Sri Lanka in the fight against international terrorism".

He added the Russians "share the grief of the relatives of those killed and wish a quick recovery to all those who were wounded".

Putin voiced confidence that "the perpetrators and the masterminds of such a cruel and cynical crime committed amid the Easter festivities will take the punishment they deserve".

The Archbishop of Colombo is calling for those responsible for the Easter Sunday blasts to be punished "mercilessly".

Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith called on Sri Lanka's Government to launch a "very impartial strong inquiry" and to punish those found responsible "mercilessly because only animals can behave like that".

Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe was meeting top military officials and tweeted that "the Government is taking immediate steps to contain the situation".

Defence Minister Ruwan Wijewardane said the Government would take "all necessary action" against any extremist group operating in Sri Lanka.\

"We believe that all the culprits ... will be taken into custody as soon as possible. They have been identified," the BBC reported him as saying.