Auckland police have recommended fewer Anzac Day events be held in the city so their officers are better able to ensure the safety of those attending.

The recommendation is in response to the Christchurch mosque attacks.

Auckland City district commander Superintendent Karyn Malthus said police did not have any information to suggest there was a "specific risk" to public safety.

However, Malthus had still asked Auckland Council and the Returned and Services Association to consolidate the number of events being held across Tamaki Makaurau.

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"In the current environment, police are continuing to provide a visible presence nationwide for the safety and reassurance of the community," she said.

Afghanistan war veteran Simon Strombom drew backlash from older veterans after he invited a Muslim cleric to pray at this year's Anzac Day service on Titahi Bay Beach. Photo / Mark Mitchell
Afghanistan war veteran Simon Strombom drew backlash from older veterans after he invited a Muslim cleric to pray at this year's Anzac Day service on Titahi Bay Beach. Photo / Mark Mitchell

"We recognise the public will want to commemorate Anzac Day across the region and we are wanting them to do that in the safest way possible, which may mean some have to travel a little further to an event."

She did not say which Auckland Anzac Day events would be merged.

The added Anzac safety measures come after a gunman attacked two Christchurch mosques, killing 50 people and injuring dozens.

It also followed news that a plan to have a Muslim cleric say a prayer at a Wellington Anzac Day service had been cancelled after the local RSA received a number of "frightening threats".

The Returned and Services Association (RSA) branch at Titahi Bay near Wellington wanted to honour the victims of the Christchurch terror attack by including a Muslim prayer in their service.

However, there was severe backlash from veterans who said the special day should remember only New Zealand and Australian soldiers who have died in wars.

Others, such as Afghanistan war veteran and organiser of the Titahi Bay service Simon Strombom, believed it was an opportunity to rise up to becoming an inclusive nation.

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Strombom said it was "hugely disappointing" that it had come to this stage and he was shocked at the abusive messages they had been receiving from Australia and across New Zealand.

"We can't guarantee certain speakers' safety with the amount of comments we've had coming in online which are clearly directed at Muslim hatred. It's absolutely unbelievable.

"After speaking with police and our Muslim community, we have decided that including the prayer would be too risky, so for security reasons we have decided to cancel the idea," he said.

Malthus said the public should continue to remain vigilant and report any suspicious or concerning behaviour to police by calling 111.