Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has travelled to Dunedin to give the Muslim Community a "wider sense of safety and security" following the Christchurch terror attacks on March 15.

Ardern has been in the city today, visiting the Al Huda Mosque and the An-Nur early learning centre, as well as meeting members of the Muslim community.

The alleged Christchurch gunman lived in Dunedin for more than a year, before the attacks almost two weeks ago.

Speaking to media this afternoon, Ardern said she was "very aware" that Dunedin was the city where the alleged gunman had been living.

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"The message I have received from the local MPs was that the Muslim community here were acutely aware of that."

She was flanked by Dunedin South MP Clare Curran and Dunedin North MP David Clark.

Ardern said she wanted to come and visit to "hear and talk about concerns and just have a chance for listening, really".

She also said she wanted to help provide the Muslim community with a "wider sense of safety and security".

"That was one of the reasons I wanted to come here – my only regret is it took a few more days than I had hoped."

She said many of the people she talked to today said they had received a lot of love and support following the attacks.

Jacinda Adern reads the Very Hungry Caterpillar to children at the Au-Nur Child Education and Care Centre in South Dunedin Photo / ODT
Jacinda Adern reads the Very Hungry Caterpillar to children at the Au-Nur Child Education and Care Centre in South Dunedin Photo / ODT

"There was one woman in the room who said she had lived in New Zealand for more than a decade, [and said] that she had never felt more at home than she had in the last 10 days."

Ardern said that was "an astounding message in the wake of what the community had experienced".

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She said there had "absolutely" been enough done to make sure the Muslim community in Dunedin felt safe.

"There was a discussion over what would happen next, what we could do to make sure the community continues to feel safe – particularly women, who so obviously wear their faith."

Ardern said there were also conversations about the ongoing police presence in the city.

She said that would continue for the "time being".

Asked if the laws around hate speech needed to be reviewed, in light of the attack, Ardern said that was something the Government was looking into.

She said New Zealand does have the human rights act, laws that cover objectionable material and provisions over harmful digital communications.

"In the wake of this attack, I think it's only right that we go back and look at the legislation we have and make sure it's covering off all that we have seen an experienced since the 15th of March."