As a young child, Katherine Singh was left traumatised after seeing a person murdered in front of her.

The Christchurch woman, who grew up in Fiji, was about 5 and was left so traumatised she couldn't even wear red as it triggered memories of the horrific attack.

Time has slowly helped the healing process but the shooting eight days ago at two Christchurch mosques has brought all the pain and horror she experienced as a child rushing back.

"As a 5-year-old it was very hard for me. This has brought it all back. I'm having nightmares, I can't sleep at night."

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"It's very emotional for us. I'm very traumatised."

Katherine Singh lost neighbours and her son lost five friends in the Christchurch shootings. Photo / Elizabeth Binning
Katherine Singh lost neighbours and her son lost five friends in the Christchurch shootings. Photo / Elizabeth Binning

Singh attended March for Love in Christchurch this morning to show her support for her neighbours and members of her family who lost loved ones.

Her 32-year-old son has been particularly affected after losing up to six friends. She said the Warrant of Fitness inspector also had 12 of his clients killed so is really feeling the loss of so many people he knew.

"He's very emotional. He's been crying all week."

Singh said she was talking with her son and would help him with any counselling he might need.

In the meantime, all her family can do is try and support each other and the families of those who lost loved ones.

At this morning's march she opted for bright colours. She was one of thousands who attended the event which was organised by three 16-year-old St Andrews students.

Ella Clearwater, Manaia Butler and Marshall Setu wanted people to stand up and say intolerance against diversity must never happen again on their generation's watch.

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"You hear about this happening around the world but to know that someone could be discriminated against like this in your own home town is a whole new level of shock, of horror and of distress", Manaia said.

It was their respective connection with minority groups and the personal affront they each personally felt that made them decide to take action.

"We can either lie down and be overtaken by the hate that inspired this assault on being different or we can stand up and lead active change," Marshall said.

"You can change our gun laws as a preventative measure but it's also about going out there and changing the things we say to each other and ways in which we behave toward each other that will propel real change."

Steve Rossell and his wife brought their 7-year-old daughter Sofia to the march. Photo / Elizabeth Binning
Steve Rossell and his wife brought their 7-year-old daughter Sofia to the march. Photo / Elizabeth Binning

Steve Rossell and his wife brought their 7-year-old daughter Sofia to the march. They lost several friends at Al Noor.

The couple, who are Muslim, said they had spoken to their Sofia about what happened.

"We spent last week giving her some space. Later, we explained the community had been attacked but we are strong."

The march started at Hagley Park North where members of different faith spoke to the crowd.

One Muslim women quoted Martin Luther King: "I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of creed."

She went on to say: "I'm not sure about America but what we experienced yesterday at Hagley Park and here today is enough confirmation New Zealand has risen."

Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel said: "Your city is so proud of you and everything you have done to unite people of all faith."

"We will be united by love, we can't be divided by hate."

The march finished outside the wall of flowers outside the Botanic Gardens.